• Amused
  • Angry
  • Annoyed
  • Awesome
  • Bemused
  • Cool
  • Crazy
  • Crying
  • Drunk
  • Geeky
  • Grumpy
  • Happy
  • Hungry
  • Innocent
  • Sad
  • Secret
  • Shy
  • Tired
  • Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
    Results 1 to 10 of 24
    1. #1
      House Broken
      K10's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 2015
      Location
      Somewhere
      Posts
      101
      Thanked: 38

      Teach Me About Your Dog Sport

      Compared to the "dog people" I've met while being a "dog person" myself, I have to say I'm really, REALLY new to the dog world... but would definitely like to get more involved. I don't think I want to personally jump into every sport out there, but I would like to know more about as many sports as I can from people who've been involved in them. To some degree, I think I'd like to see if I could find a goal for a future dog/dog activity. Some of the reason I'd like to know more is because friends who are adopting new dogs know that I'm a little more into dogs than the average person they know, so they ask for suggestions (but I don't really know).

      So I guess the kind of things I'm most interested to know is what people and dog personalities are best for the sport that you compete in? What do you wish more people knew about your sport? What are the best/worst experiences you've had with your sport? What should newbies know before starting? How did you know a certain sport was right for your dog? How hard is it to advance to higher levels in your sport? What is the best training advice you have for someone who is interested in your sport? What is the hardest title to earn, and why, and how do you train for it? How does trialing for your sport work? Are you open to people who don't compete in your sport coming out on trial days to watch/ask questions, or is there a better time to do that? If people are able to watch trials, what is the best way to watch, and what should a person know about the sport before coming out to a trial?

      I know this could lead to lengthy responses, and I'm all for it. I also know that answers can vary due to opinions and personal experiences. I really am just curious, and I think it's hard to decipher these things through rule books, and official websites... I think it will click for me tons better if it comes from personal experience. Also, I feel somewhat less guilty posting that gigantic list of questions here than interrogating people about it at events!

    2. #2
      Senior Dog
      Meeps83's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      Wisconsin
      Posts
      1,838
      Thanked: 981
      I think when picking a sport, go for one that interests YOU and see how your dog likes it. If they don't, pick a different sport. Right now we are doing agility and Maverick loves it. He doesn't care about the bangs, different textures, looks, or going thru/over/on new things. It's fun and a game. As long as he has fun that's all I care about!

    3. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Meeps83 For This Useful Post:

      Maxx&Emma (05-22-2015), windycanyon (05-28-2015)

    4. #3
      Senior Dog
      Maxx&Emma's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      SE, PA
      Posts
      4,407
      Thanked: 1994
      Maxx and I have loved nosework and tracking. We also did obedience but Maxx did not seem to enjoy it the way he had nosework and tracking and it was all about him!

      Labs do great in both venues, it is hard to explain the excitement I get from Maxx when he knows we are getting ready for classes. He is EXTREMELY enthusiastic, lol! I have watched shy dogs really gain confidence in nosework so I would definitely recommend it for any dog that is shy or lacks confidence. (Maxx has never had such an issue!)

      I absolutely agree with Meeps, if your dog enjoys it you will know and how can you not enjoy something that really makes your dog happy?
      Hidden Content

      Tammy
      Maxx and Emma Jean

      Ozzy - 10/2002 - 06/2011 - Rest well my sweet boy. You are forever remembered, forever missed, forever in my heart.

    5. #4
      Senior Dog
      Annette47's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      Central NJ
      Posts
      2,037
      Thanked: 1814
      I saw a shirt once that described Obedience as “the bond made visible” and that really resonated. Obedience for me, involves the dog/handler working together so closely it’s almost as if you are reading each other’s minds which is what I love about it - not so much what we are doing, but creating that kind of a partnership.

      It does require a lot of patience and desire for precision - my dogs and I enjoy the challenge, but some people (and dogs) find it boring ... just depends on the personalities involved. I think Chloe enjoys both the food, but mostly figuring out how to please me. Pretty much any dog sport you would want to do (as well as just being a good pet) involves basic obedience. If you find you enjoy the process of teaching the dog new things, then you might enjoy taking it further, but basic classes are good for everyone!
      Annette

      Cookie (Jamrah’s Legally Blonde, BN) 6/4/2015
      Sassy (Jamrah’s Blonde Ambition, BN) 6/4/2015

      Chloe (HIT HC Windsong’s Femme Fatale, UDX2, OM4) 6/7/2009


      Remembering:
      Scully (Coventry's Truth Is Out There, UD, RN) 4/4/1996 - 6/30/2011
      Our foster Jolie (UCh Windsong’s Genuine Risk, CDX, WC) 5/26/1999 - 3/2/2014
      and Mulder (Coventry’s I Want to Believe, UD, VER, WC, RN) 5/26/1999 - 4/20/2015

      Hidden Content

    6. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Annette47 For This Useful Post:

      Charlotte K. (05-23-2015), K10 (05-23-2015), Scoutpout (05-24-2015)

    7. #5
      Chief Pooper Scooper
      JenC's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      Colorado
      Posts
      2,130
      Thanked: 2070
      My experience was a natural progression, thanks to an awesome dog trainer. My husband and I had our first 2 labs (both passed last year) and we wanted to go through training with them, like everyone should do if they own a lab. Wendy asked, do you want to learn good house manners or do you want to learn competitive obedience? I asked what's the difference? She explained, and I said, well, let's train for competitive and if I like it, I can try competing. If I don't like it, I still get a well trained dog. Maddy ended up with her WC, RAE, CD, URO2, and UCD. Hudler with a CD and RN. CGC's too of course. I've gone on to train all our dogs in rally and obedience since then.
      Jen & Tickle!
      Hidden Content

    8. The Following User Says Thank You to JenC For This Useful Post:

      K10 (05-23-2015)

    9. #6
      Best Friend Retriever
      Anna Scott's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 2014
      Location
      Canada
      Posts
      454
      Thanked: 151
      Over the years we have done obedience, rally and field work. My dogs have been more suited to the field work. I once had a very wonderful judge with a great sense of humour tell me he felt sorry for my dog until he saw her jump as high as his shoulder (he was six foot five) to get the dumb bell. She loved the retrieves and the jumps but hated the healing. There was no reward in it. I have put CDX, WCX, HRCH, RE and QFTR and SH on various dogs. We are working on a master now with one and just starting another in derby (junior)
      I love to field trial but you need a thick skin. If you want to come home with a ribbon every time then field trialing is not the game for you. It is extremely competitive and most dogs are in the hands of a pro handler most of their time. With each dog my goal is to get that one step farther. When the young one gets going I hope to at least finish an Amateur with her. Achieving a AFTCH will be a dream.
      Any title takes a lot of work but I think achieving a utility title (Canada) in obedience takes far more dedication and time than I was willing to put in. As I said my dogs loved the retrieves and jumps in open but hated the healing. They were able to do the directed jumping, caught on to the scent discrimination and the hand signals but again the healing let them down. In field trials the top titles are the Amateur Field Trial Champion and the Field Trial Champion. These are extremely hard to achieve without the help of a pro trainer. I know people that have been in the game for over 25 years and never had a champion. One was a quarter point away and another had 108 all age open points but could not get a win. You must have that blue first ribbon before you get the title no matter how many other points your dog has achieved.
      Take some time and perhaps go see some events and then decide what you want to do with your dog. The only rule for watching field events is to stay where the marshal puts you (gallery) and wear dark clothing so you don't distract the running dog. You can watch obedience events again being aware not to distract the dog. You will find that there is always someone who will talk to you and explain what is going on.

    10. The Following User Says Thank You to Anna Scott For This Useful Post:

      K10 (05-23-2015)

    11. #7
      House Broken
      K10's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 2015
      Location
      Somewhere
      Posts
      101
      Thanked: 38
      So, it seems like agility and obedience trials are easy to find in my area, especially since the facility where we do rally training has them. We know where to find flyball events, and canine freestyle, but there aren't many. Nosework, we are told, doesn't allow anyone who isn't competing or helping out with the event to attend.

      I'm having a hard time finding field trials, or conformation shows in my area. Any tips on how to search? I am finding a lot of out of date info, but nothing current. Ironically, these are the things that I'm most curious about. I just don't know anyone who does either, so I know next to nothing about them... but I really would like to see what they're all about.

      Any tips on how to observe conformation shows? I've kind of found from browsing different breed forums that people who know nothing about conformation (i.e. me) are really annoying (okay, it's not always said in those words) to those competing. On the flip side... I often see people write that to get to know about a breed, it's a good idea to watch a show, and start talking with people who have dogs you like.

      I've found with the events I've been to for other trials, people who aren't busy will usually recognize that there's an unfamiliar face in the crowd, introduce themselves, and start to tell you about what's going on... when that person gets to a point where they need to do something, they quickly introduce you to somebody else who can continue to explain what's going on. Is that typical of most kinds of events?

    12. #8
      Senior Dog
      Sad
       
      Charlotte K.'s Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      somewhere out there
      Posts
      910
      Thanked: 558
      The website American Kennel Club - The Dogs Champion - American Kennel Club has an events search section that is useful. Try going to a Lab specialty if you have a Lab to see them in action. For example, the Lab National will be at Purina Farms in October this year. If you are going to a local specialty, you may want to meet up with a friend that you make here who is local.

    13. The Following User Says Thank You to Charlotte K. For This Useful Post:

      K10 (05-23-2015)

    14. #9
      House Broken
      K10's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 2015
      Location
      Somewhere
      Posts
      101
      Thanked: 38
      Quote Originally Posted by Charlotte K. View Post
      The website American Kennel Club - The Dogs Champion - American Kennel Club has an events search section that is useful. Try going to a Lab specialty if you have a Lab to see them in action. For example, the Lab National will be at Purina Farms in October this year. If you are going to a local specialty, you may want to meet up with a friend that you make here who is local.

      Thanks! I didn't realize there was so much info on the AKC's site.

    15. #10
      Senior Dog
      Tanya's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      Eastern Ontario Canada
      Posts
      2,661
      Thanked: 1481
      honestly I recommend people just pick a class that works with their schedule and have fun. you can do lots of fun dabbling without EVER competing. I don't do sports "to compete" - that is a possible end goal sure, but it isn't THE Goal. we take classes and learn to have fun and bond. With Rocky we did many different sports. Lots of dog sports you never really need to compete if you chose not too. if you like a class and the dog seems interested then you keep going. Classes are to keep the dogs mind active and bond. Even just taking a class like intermediate then advanced obedience is great!

      So look at what's even available in your area. Depending on how far you are willing to drive and how much money you want to spend that alone may impact you start with

      Penny has more drive so we are sticking to a few and getting father. we are starting our second year of agility, we take a class per week. I don't have tons of money an time to be going out multiple times a week Out competitions if we get there wil

      ETA: I recommend starting with basic obedience that's always the basis of everything!

    Quick Reply Quick Reply

     



    Not a Member of the Labrador Retriever Chat Forums Yet?
    Register for Free and Share Your Labrador Retriever Photos

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •