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    1. #1
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      Pancreatitis and raw

      So Loony had a pancreatitis attack from a raw marrow bone last week. She threw up 12 times in 12 hours, 2 bouts of diarrhea. She's normally okay with them, but for some reason this one really wrecked havoc on her system. We went to the vet for IV fluids and an anti nausea pill. She's back to normal now.

      So before her attack, I was starting to feed raw. We were on chicken thighs and hadn't transitioned to other meats yet. She'd been on raw for about 3 weeks and was doing really, really well.

      After the attack, I did 50/50 white rice and chicken breast for 3 days, and she's been back on kibble ever since because I worried about the skin on chicken thighs.

      Can I feed her raw again or should I stick with kibble? Should I still feed raw but get lean meats like 95% lean ground beef and skinless chicken thighs and breasts? Or are bone in skin on chicken thighs okay?

      We aren't feeding her RMBs again and sticking to antlers, since she never has a problem from those.
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    2. #2
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      IDK for sure, but I always remove the skin on raw chicken before feeding it to the dogs. Misty gets really sick if she eats skin.

    3. #3
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      Yikes! I don't have any advice, as none of my dogs have ever had issues eating raw animal fat. I am glad that Luna is doing better! That would have been a scary situation for me.

    4. #4
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      Did she manage to get all the marrow out of the bone? If so, I wonder if that's what prompted the reaction? If your Vet supports raw feeding then that would be the person to ask. But if it was me I think I would back off on the skins and anything fatty for a couple of weeks to let her system calm down and then re-introduce fats slowly. And no more marrow, if she did manage to get it out.

    5. #5
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      IMO, yes you can still feed raw. Marrow is very rich, so yeah if she ate a lot of it that could cause an issue. And some dogs are more sensitive than others. I’d keep things pretty bland to start out, especially since she was new to transitioning anyways. Bone-in chicken, and remove the fat and skin at first. But then slowly start leaving it on. Fat is actually an important part of the raw diet, dogs really do need it in their diet. And I would say you can feed raw like normal, just be aware and I would avoid feeding super fatty meals. Like for example when I feed pork, some pieces of pork have quite a bit of fat on them, so for her I would still give some of that fat, but not a lot all at once. My dogs have never had issues with pancreatitis, but it is something I think about and for fatty things like pork, or beef heart caps, I won’t feed that fat all at once, and will instead add a bit to each meal and spread it out.

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    7. #6
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      So I can continue on raw, just make sure to remove skin and extra fat for a couple weeks, then slowly introduce the fat back in, like only removing half the skin for a few weeks, etc.?

      She did get a ton of marrow out of the bone (probably ending up being 1/3-1/2 cup of marrow) and there was some fat on the bone to begin with. She'll have looser stool after getting raw bones, but she never had anything like this. I was so freaked out when she didn't want to eat her dinner. Luna would sell her body on the black market for a piece of kibble so that was a huge red flag. I watched her overnight, kept palpating her abdomen etc. and she went to the vet the next day. If her abdomen was rigid I would've emergency vetted it, but I assumed it was pancreatitis which meant she could go in on Friday. She didn't actually need to see the vet medically, but it helped her recover quicker with the drug and IV fluids.

      My vet isn't a raw person, but my breeder's vet is a huge raw person and holds seminars on it etc. She's very holistic. Both are the same distance. I love my vet and some of the vet techs, the practice is great. The holistic vet has an awful practice but she herself is great.

    8. #7
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      You can still feed raw, but you should be careful what you feed.








    9. #8
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      Having had a dog with a pancreatitis attack years and years ago.....go VERY VERY slow on reintroducing fat content.

      Personally NO bones for now - of ANY kind. The key is to make digestion as easy as possible; thus NO raw chicken bones right now either.

      Definitely do either raw chicken breasts, or very lean ground beef; if you're feeding veggies - OVERLY cook them for now. If you're doing grains, make it pre-cooked WHITE rice - extremely easy to digest.

      The goal is to make everything simple digestively - it takes WEEKS for entire inflammation to subside and once a dog has had an attack, they are VERY susceptible to others.

      This is a VERY serious situation as you do NOT want this to occur again - pancreatitis is not only deadly, but can lead to shock, life long diabetes, etc.

      NO MORE MARROW bones - period!!!! NEVER AGAIN!

      Feed several very bland meals a day for several weeks; very very slowly reintroducing fat....but not for a few weeks!

    10. #9
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      Jessie has had 2 bouts of pancreatitis, the first one very severe.
      We still feed her raw & are careful about the amount of fat. She doesn't get chicken much, but when she gets turkey we remove all visible fat & skin. There's still enough left that you can't remove to satisfy the need for fat. Ground turkey, chicken & beef are about the leanest.....duck is higher in fat & should be fed only occasionally if you are worried about fat content. Pancreatitis is nasty & we need to be so careful these dogs don't get overweight.

    11. #10
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      I forgot to add, if you're feeding raw marrow bones, try to remove as much marrow as you can first. Seems a shame but its murder on the pancreas.

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