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  • Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
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    1. #11
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      Quote Originally Posted by lovemylabby View Post

      But..I never looked at my Lab as a large breed.
      I don't either. Opal is a compact Lab, at 55 lbs, Ursa is a little taller at about 60 lbs. And all our past Labs were not large either.
      There's a lot of hype about large-breed puppy food. Don't believe everything you read on it.

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    3. #12
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      I think the large breed puppy foods have a slightly different calcium/phosphorous ratio, so that they puppies don't grow too fast; they promote a slower, steadier growth pattern. Growing too fast can lead to joint issues and hip displasia (I know that there are other reasons, as well). I've always been told and read that dogs that will be 50+ pounds at maturity are classified as large breed, since they have so much growing to do during puppyhood, compared to smaller breeds.

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      windycanyon (08-22-2018)

    5. #13
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      Labs nowadays run the gamut of sizes, you see people breeding everything from "canoe" and "mini Labs" to "king size" Labs (and German Shepherds). I think of most Labs as medium sized dogs. It's about height for me, not just weight. Greyhounds, Borzoi can be large dogs without the heft of something like a Bullmastiff.

      All three of my Labradors came home on "all life stages" food. I don't think it's necessary to feed large breed puppy/dog food. The biggest contributing factors IMO to joint issues are hereditary factors coupled with improper/excessive exercise protocols for youngsters, and early spay/neuter. I think a lot of pet owners create their dogs' ortho problems themselves, and it has little to nothing to do with how or what the animals are fed.

    6. #14
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      Quote Originally Posted by Beth C View Post
      I think the large breed puppy foods have a slightly different calcium/phosphorous ratio, so that they puppies don't grow too fast; they promote a slower, steadier growth pattern. Growing too fast can lead to joint issues and hip displasia (I know that there are other reasons, as well). I've always been told and read that dogs that will be 50+ pounds at maturity are classified as large breed, since they have so much growing to do during puppyhood, compared to smaller breeds.

      And this is why I feed a large breed puppy food to mine. They grow fast and can have a lot of bone.
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    8. #15
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      Quote Originally Posted by Beth C View Post
      I think the large breed puppy foods have a slightly different calcium/phosphorous ratio, so that they puppies don't grow too fast; they promote a slower, steadier growth pattern. Growing too fast can lead to joint issues and hip displasia (I know that there are other reasons, as well). I've always been told and read that dogs that will be 50+ pounds at maturity are classified as large breed, since they have so much growing to do during puppyhood, compared to smaller breeds.
      Not in the Pro Plan formulas. Large Breed Puppy and Regular Puppy both have 1.1% Ca and 0.8% P. Pro Plan Sport 30/20 ALS actually has a lower amount--0.9% Ca to 0.7% P.

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      lovemylabby (08-24-2018)

    10. #16
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      Quote Originally Posted by barry581 View Post
      I love messing with them making change. After they ring up my stuff I'll hand them a bill which they enter in to the computer and tells them what to give me back, about that time I'll give them some random change which makes them have to calculate it in their head. Seldom goes well and I usually have to tell them what to give me. Mind you I only do this when no one is in line behind me, but it is pretty fun!
      The scarier thing is I have done the same with a bank teller. The look on her face told me right away she was lost. I finally had to tell her exactly what to give me. Her response ... "are you sure?" I said yes, and she took my word for it. I then counted back all of the money to show her that it was correct. I couldn't leave her thinking she has just been robbed.

      A kid at Wally World rang up the wrong amount tendered on my order once. It got bad enough that I took back the bill I gave him and handed him the bill that he rang in. He was more than happy to give me my change then. The world has come to not being able to think without a computer, phone or tablet

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    12. #17
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      My Sarah weighs in at 77lbs and i consider her a medium size breed, i don't feed large breed formula to my labs. Now Bailey was a newfy mix and I still only fed him proplan regular puppy food and regular adult food. Coleman was a big lab 90-95lbs and I only fed him regular food not the large breed formula.
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    14. #18
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      Out here in new england area where i live most labs are smaller . atleast the ones i see are. gigi looks taller and bigger then any at 87 lbs now. But she is not a pure lab so i think that might be it. I do see 2 big male chocolate labs . both came from the same puppy store at different years when i spoke to the owners . Mostly there are 3 breeders locally and they all breed smaller labs that max out at 50-60 lbs so you see them alot. Gigi is regular dog food. As a puppy i did give her big puppy food.

      again i would consider gigi as big as she is a large dog for her weight with long legs and extra large chest .

    15. #19
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      Quote Originally Posted by JenC View Post
      Not in the Pro Plan formulas. Large Breed Puppy and Regular Puppy both have 1.1% Ca and 0.8% P. Pro Plan Sport 30/20 ALS actually has a lower amount--0.9% Ca to 0.7% P.
      Most of the folks here who feed PPP feed adult to their pups, I think for the same reason. If you calculated Ca based on caloric value several yrs ago, it was actually the better formula for puppies. I remember going thru this w/ a vet/ Lab breeder and she agreed with my calculations.

      I've personally had fantastic results w/ Euk LBP but it's really scaled down on Ca:P

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      lovemylabby (08-24-2018)

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