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    1. #11
      Chief Pooper Scooper
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      Quote Originally Posted by YMS_1975 View Post
      To be perfectly honest, I can't afford putting him in any obedience training program.

      I Googled the prong collar, and it looks kinda......creepy; border line sadistic (sorry I'm just picturing Jigsaw strapping one onto a dog saying "I want to play a game").

      Is this thing safe for long term use? I don't know much about them; this is my first time hearing about them. I'll do some more research into them and once I'm satisfied I can't hurt my dog with it, I'll pick one up.

      Cheers.
      The prong won't be long term but it will be useless if you know nothing about training a dog. And honestly, the problems you'll have with a dog without class make it very worth it to invest a couple hundred in a class.

      If you can't afford a class, spend some time on Google and YouTube and bring up some video classes and get busy. Training is part of owning a dog.
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    3. #12
      Senior Dog
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      Thought the same thing about a prong at first but, buy a good one and learn how to fit it and use it properly and you will do less damage than allowing your pup to choke. He can badly hurt his neck, if you let him, even on a flat collar. Use a prong correctly and there will be NO damage. Of course the same can be said for any training tool.

      You should really try to dig up the money for training classes, it might save you a lot of grief down the road. Maybe even shortly down the road.

      The thing that worked best for us was changing directions. BEFORE he pulls. ZIg and zag, about turn, reverse about turn. Pup won't know which way you are going to go next but he wants to go with you so he stays by your side. You will not get far at first and I still have to do this sometimes but it works. Key point, change direction BEFORE he pulls.

      Some folks have had luck with just stopping. Don't resume walking till he stops pulling. Didn't work a darn for us when my dog was the age of yours but once he got to be around three years old it did work.

      There are lots of little tricks a trainer will show you.

      ETA: Fitting the prong is also important and especially when pup is growing and you have to make a lot of adjustments to keep up with his increasing neck size. I forgot to say learn how to fit it.
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    4. #13
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      Hello...

      Proper training is really the owner's responsibility and is very necessary for any dog...especially a puppy.

      Please check around in your area for a basic obedience or puppy beginner's class.

      Maybe you can cut corners somewhere else...and save some money to put toward the classes?

      Do you have a Veterinarian that you can consult? Has your puppy been to a Vet?

    5. #14
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      I have an Easy Walk harness you are welcome to if you would like it. I did try it but did not like the way it changed Maxx's gait so I spent the time necessary to teach my dog to walk properly on a flat buckle collar. It took time, patience and consistency but it is absolutely doable. If you do decide on a prong please make sure it is fitted and worn properly, many pet store employees have no idea how to fit them properly.

      If you are interested in the harness I have, send me a PM!
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    6. #15
      Senior Dog
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      Labs tend to have three misbehaviors that take a lot of patience and training: biting; walking nice on leash; and jumping on people. But if Buddy is 5 months that means you are past the worst of the biting- hurray! This is the ideal time to teach him to walk on leash because of course he's just going to continue to get bigger and stronger.

      Trying different collars can be helpful but the real key is to make every walk a mini-training session. I like the ideas at this site: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtu...not-pull-leash

      While it can be very helpful to have a trainer, you can do this on your own. Even when you're in classes, it only works if you diligently do the homework with your dog every day! If you are patient- walking nice takes time- and work actively on this, every day, Buddy can become a nice walker!
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    7. #16
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      Either a prong or an easy walk harness. As far as training classes, you can go to YouTube and search for videos. Not as good as the real thing, but better than nothing!

    8. #17
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      if you do follow the recommendation of going with a prong, realize it won't train the dog to walk on leash, only give you "control" and hopefully stop him from chocking himself as you work on basic obedience. PLEASE make sure to read up and fit it properly - 80% (or more) of prongs I see on dogs are fitted completely wrong. And make sure to remove it when you are not actively working (they are not to be left on when the dog is offleash).

      there are MANY tools you can try. the Gentle Leader is another (here's a bit of a video on how to get the dog used to it before you use it): Jean Donaldson gets conditioned emotional response while fitting Gentle Leader - YouTube

      I HIGHLY recommend a basic obedience class. Depending where you are some cities have less expensive classes (though do research teh trainer).

      Some sites with how to teach your pup to walk nicely on leash (positive trainers): Pet Education: Loose Leash Walking Summary
      or Dr. Yin’s Animal Behavior and Training Videos | Dr. Sophia Yin, DVM, MS


      If classes are an absolutely impossibility, here are links to sites with tons of information and training tips (how to's) from qualified experience educated individuals. Be careful and question what you see when you browse the internet for training advice. there is more bad advice than good and they worst will always make it look and sound like they really know what they are talking about.
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    9. #18
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      As above. We have a 5 month old Lab and use a Starmark prong collar for her training, and it works wonderfully (getting it on and off takes a little practice, but it's not difficult). Indeed, most of the time we can just use a flat collar, because she doesn't pull much—however, I would *really* recommend a prong collar and knowing how to use it properly.

      I also want to repeat the above in re training classes. Labs (and their owners) need training. I can't imagine having a Lab without some formal training—I understand it's an expenditure, but it's also a responsibility.

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    11. #19
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      You need a nylon choke collar and need to know that it must be up high on the neck and right behind the ears. This way you have control and it will not choke the dog. If the choke collar drops too low on the neck and the dog pulls they will choke.

      Show people use a choke in the ring and used properly the dog performs perfectly with no choking.

      You need to know that when you put the choke on the dog it should look like a P as you face the dog. The ring the leash attaches to must be over the dogs right shoulder. In this way when you let the tension off the lease the choke lets go. If you put it on backwards it will not release when you let up the tension on the leash.

      This is the best collar for training while teaching verbal commands. A flat collar will choke and not give you control.

      I would recommend the above prior to a prong. If you don't have the money to go to a training class and learn from a pro - please do not try to work with a prong by yourself or you will hurt your pup.

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    13. #20
      Senior Dog
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      Patty, do you mean like a Volhard collar? That's what one of our, well my, first training classes endorsed and they supplied the collar. I've used it ever since and had a chain one made for Oban. At the time most training places would not take puppies younger than 6 months old and they did not like to see the Volhard used on puppies younger than that.

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