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    Thread: "UP" Command

    1. #1
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      "UP" Command

      Aye Mates,
      I use training tables and pace boards extensively early on in the development of dogs that I work with. I teach the command "UP" and use it to have the dogs jump up on any elevated surface that I want them on. The command is fully understood and the K9's are very responsive to it. It can certainly be a back save when. one works with a number of Labs and wants them up on training tables, in UTV's, etc. I do not like me dogs jumping down onto hard surfaces and will usually lift them and place the dog gently on the ground. I do not do it on surfaces they would normally jump down to whilst in the course of hunting or training. I do try to minimize hard surface impact where I can.

      Here LEXIE and TRAD have gotten up on a training table upon my issue of the "UP" command at the conclusion of our evening "bolding walk". When. I want the dogs to exit the table I use the command "OFF" and I reserve the command "DOWN" for when I want the K9 in a prone position laying down on their belly.

      Cheers,
      THE DOG WHISTLER🍀
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    2. #2
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      A little different here. Archie came to us knowing not to jump up on people but he so wants to. An unexpected jump up from him would certainly knock me down. What I have taught him is if I cock my knee and say up, he is allowed to gently place his front paws on my upper leg. I give him a good head scratch and he gives me a kiss. We're both happy and safe.

      I use the command "load" for getting into the crate in the SUV. I too do not like him jumping down, except from the couch when I use the command "off". I'm unable to lift him down from the SUV so have a good grip on his harness to help him down and the impact is lessened.

    3. #3
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      We are working on this with Chutes. We use the command "HUP-UP." DH puts his arm out or his knee out when kneeling on one and Chutes' will put his front paws up. He'll also jump up to any elevated surface we indicate to, including the bed and the sofa (which he's only allowed on when invited.) Same with jumping up for hellos as mentioned by @POPTOP, only when invited.

      Such a handy command.

      We also use "Down" and "Off" similarly. Down is used for laying down. Off is used for commanding him to get off of whatever he is on (unless it's too high, then we will lift him down) or to stop jumping up.

    4. #4
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      Quote Originally Posted by jenfarm View Post
      We are working on this with Chutes. We use the command "HUP-UP." DH puts his arm out or his knee out when kneeling on one and Chutes' will put his front paws up. He'll also jump up to any elevated surface we indicate to, including the bed and the sofa (which he's only allowed on when invited.) Same with jumping up for hellos as mentioned by @POPTOP, only when invited.

      Such a handy command.

      We also use "Down" and "Off" similarly. Down is used for laying down. Off is used for commanding him to get off of whatever he is on (unless it's too high, then we will lift him down) or to stop jumping up.
      To each their own but I do not let a dog jump on me for any reason. Some dogs will interpret that as a sign of weakness and an invitation to dominate. I much prefer to train in good habits than to extinguish negative behaviors. I am not certain Chutes will exclusively save that for only you. Will he discriminate between a strong adult, a child, and a frail elderly person? Just food for thought.

      Irishwhistler

    5. #5
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      Quote Originally Posted by IRISHWISTLER View Post
      To each their own but I do not let a dog jump on me for any reason. Some dogs will interpret that as a sign of weakness and an invitation to dominate. I much prefer to train in good habits than to extinguish negative behaviors. I am not certain Chutes will exclusively save that for only you. Will he discriminate between a strong adult, a child, and a frail elderly person? Just food for thought.

      Irishwhistler
      I see where you're coming from, and I agree that some dogs do have issues with that. The jumping up was really bad when he was a younger puppy, but we nixed that pretty quick. We don't have issues with him jumping up at all anymore (unless by invitation, and DH is pretty much the only one that does that with him.) We actually have the opposite problem with him. Instead of jumping, he melts to the floor for pets and belly rubs. He met the little girl down the street last night (she was about 2?) and he was so sweet and gentle with her. We were on him like hawks and it was a very slow approach (and he was on a lead), of course, but he did so well. She was so in love with him and he just rolled over for belly rubs, tail a waggin'.
      Last edited by jenfarm; 08-02-2017 at 08:22 AM.

    6. #6
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      Quote Originally Posted by jenfarm View Post
      I see where you're coming from, and I agree that some dogs do have issues with that. The jumping up was really bad when he was a younger puppy, but we nixed that pretty quick. We don't have issues with him jumping up at all anymore (unless by invitation, and DH is pretty much the only one that does that with him.) We actually have the opposite problem with him. Instead of jumping, he melts to the floor for pets and belly rubs. He met the little girl down the street last night (she was about 2?) and he was so sweet and gentle with her. We were on him like hawks and it was a very slow approach (and he was on a lead), of course, but he did so well. She was so in love with him and he just rolled over for belly rubs, tail a waggin'.

      Jen,
      Ye pup sounds like a very sweet albeit submissive dog. What you reap will essentially come from that which you sow. If the submissive behavior exhibited when meeting a new person or dog is viewed as problematic or an annoyance, do NOT reward the behavior by letting others pet or belly rub the pup as that will be a reward for that behavior. If you really don't care about that, then that is your preference and you can let it continue. Were it me, I would not let anyone pet the dog upon the initial greeting and would work the dog on lead to a SIT at HEEL position, delay that position and then let the dog receive physical contact in that preferred position as a reward for that behavior. Certainly you can use a behavioral marker such as a clicker or your verbal praise "GOOD" to let the dog mentally mark the behavior you seek.

      Irishwhistler

    7. #7
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      Quote Originally Posted by IRISHWISTLER View Post
      Jen,
      Ye pup sounds like a very sweet albeit submissive dog. What you reap will essentially come from that which you sow. If the submissive behavior exhibited when meeting a new person or dog is viewed as problematic or an annoyance, do NOT reward the behavior by letting others pet or belly rub the pup as that will be a reward for that behavior. If you really don't care about that, then that is your preference and you can let it continue. Were it me, I would not let anyone pet the dog upon the initial greeting and would work the dog on lead to a SIT at HEEL position, delay that position and then let the dog receive physical contact in that preferred position as a reward for that behavior. Certainly you can use a behavioral marker such as a clicker or your verbal praise "GOOD" to let the dog mentally mark the behavior you seek.

      Irishwhistler
      We actually just recently discussed this with our trainers. At first it was cute how he "melted" when meeting new people or even just seeing us when we get home or anything like that. Our trainers actually nicknamed him "the melting dog" because of it. If DH didn't have certain training goals for him as he grows into an adult, it probably wouldn't be a problem and we'd allow it to continue. But now that we are working into more advanced obedience, we are realizing how problematic it may become when expecting other behaviors from him. Per instance, when we use sit, down or any other "controlling" command, an implied stay is expected (he's getting so good at this). We are now working on getting him into a sit or down when a new guest (or one of us) enters the home, or a polite sit and wait when meeting new people on our walks or other public places, but being that he's a "melter" it's causing him to "break" the command when we or anyone approaches him to pet and say hi. Again, if we didn't have such specific training goals and expectations of him in the future we would continue to allow because he is SO cute when he does it. But since our conversation with our trainers, we have begun trying to break that habit of his... I'll admit we messed up last night when we allowed it when meeting Bella. It's definitely something we are going to need to work on and pay close attention to enforcing because other people tend to find it so cute when he does it as well that of course they continue to give him affection when he does. It's gonna be a difficult break, but we definitely need to start working on it now while he's still young... I agree.

    8. #8
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      Quote Originally Posted by jenfarm View Post
      We actually just recently discussed this with our trainers. At first it was cute how he "melted" when meeting new people or even just seeing us when we get home or anything like that. Our trainers actually nicknamed him "the melting dog" because of it. If DH didn't have certain training goals for him as he grows into an adult, it probably wouldn't be a problem and we'd allow it to continue. But now that we are working into more advanced obedience, we are realizing how problematic it may become when expecting other behaviors from him. Per instance, when we use sit, down or any other "controlling" command, an implied stay is expected (he's getting so good at this). We are now working on getting him into a sit or down when a new guest (or one of us) enters the home, or a polite sit and wait when meeting new people on our walks or other public places, but being that he's a "melter" it's causing him to "break" the command when we or anyone approaches him to pet and say hi. Again, if we didn't have such specific training goals and expectations of him in the future we would continue to allow because he is SO cute when he does it. But since our conversation with our trainers, we have begun trying to break that habit of his... I'll admit we messed up last night when we allowed it when meeting Bella. It's definitely something we are going to need to work on and pay close attention to enforcing because other people tend to find it so cute when he does it as well that of course they continue to give him affection when he does. It's gonna be a difficult break, but we definitely need to start working on it now while he's still young... I agree.
      Jen,
      OK so you have identified that the behavior is a problem and does not fit into your overall objectives for the dog. The technique of "delay' and rewarding the dog for maintaining a sit and not melting for increasingly longer durations will help in minimizing the behavior. Consistency across the board in all environments is critical to success and nobody should be allowed to pet the dog unless he is maintaining the posture you are aiming for. It is up to you to control those around him that want to approach him and pet him (thus rewarding him). It needs to be ONLY on your terms and for the benefit of your K9. When asked "can I pet your dog", you need to take a hardline and say NO he is in training. Most folks will understand. others won't. Be firm. One incident of reward for a negative behavior you are seeking to extinguish can set you and your dog back by weeks. Food for thought, I wish you the best in your goals for Chutes.

      Cheers,
      Irishwhistler

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      jenfarm (08-03-2017)

    10. #9
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      Lexi has grown into a true beauty.

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      IRISHWISTLER (08-03-2017)

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