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    1. #1
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      Researching Puppy Food

      Though we are completely agreeable with all the suggestions the breeder is giving us, we still need to know about these suggestions. One of the suggestions and part of the contract is that the pup should be fed Royal Canin Medium Puppy food until the age of 6 months, then if we choose to change, only a note to the breeder is needed. After researching this product, I'm really impressed with the mission and the product itself. Especially this:

      Mannan-oligosaccharides / Carbohydrates / Nutrients / Your Pet's Nutrition / Home - RoyalCanin

      Having rabbits, and raising a litter, I'm truly well aware of the delicate transition of their digestive system from kit to mature rabbit. And that if it's not watched and their gut flora is thrown off, major problems can occur to affect that rabbit the rest of it's life. It's definitely important the transition is for pup's as well and knowing the focus is back on the dog, with the help of breeders, just like it has been for rabbits, feel confident with this suggestion and plan to keep the pup on it until 1 year old.

      KAZ

    2. #2
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      Also the fact that trace minerals are being utilized to help the body absorb nutrition better.

      Chelated Trace Elements / Minerals / Nutrients / Your Pet's Nutrition / Home - RoyalCanin

      The wheat grass, which has lots of trace minerals is what helped my Neville fight "wry neck". An infection that can be deadly. Using the wheatgrass, it helped Neville absorb what his body needed to fight the infection, along with the antibiotics. Isolated incident and Neville has been right as rain ever since.

      KAZ

    3. #3
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      I would just feed what the breeder if feeding given you have found a great breeder. They have raised litters and pups all their life on that food so they must see how it works from cradle to grave on their dogs. I wouldn't worry over finding a new food and changing it in the future unless there was a valid health reason to change it. that's just me.

    4. The Following User Says Thank You to Tanya For This Useful Post:

      kelsyg (06-15-2014)

    5. #4
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      Feed what works is my advice. Honestly, and I know it may not be the popular sentiment around here, but I believe what you feed matters less than you think. Genetics and weight should be your top concerns, followed by weight and genetics. I once had a very old vet who had been in practice for over 50 years tell me that if a dog is gonna get cancer it's gonna get cancer and most other problems can be avoided or at least not become horribly bad by not letting your dog get fat. Obviously you want to pay attention to general analysis especially protein, fat, calcium, etc. but those can be the appropriate levels for your dog from a grocery store food all the up to the most expensive food.

      That being said, my dogs do eat expensive food. But only because I "enjoy" the smaller poops, the fewer bad farts, they both have allergies to a certain degree, and both have sensitive tummies to some degree as well (lucky me!). I do sometimes worry about things for no particular reason but I try to stay off the food roller coaster because it can be terribly stressful and time consuming. Sometimes I think about supplements but if I'm spending $100+ per month for food and they look and feel great I guess I shouldn't have to. Keeping excess weight off of them is better than any supplement I am aware of.

    6. #5
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      Quote Originally Posted by Tanya View Post
      I would just feed what the breeder if feeding given you have found a great breeder. They have raised litters and pups all their life on that food so they must see how it works from cradle to grave on their dogs. I wouldn't worry over finding a new food and changing it in the future unless there was a valid health reason to change it. that's just me.
      Truly appreciate your view. Actually have to say, and my husband agrees we did find a good, reputable, responsible breeder. The updates on Mom and the litter, the facts on what the pups should be doing, (eyes are open now), it's like we were right there in her living room. Definitely will follow her suggestion as she has raised litters and pups at all stages of life successfully, but think it's good to know why the food does well, how it affects the pup and it's growth, and what to look for if the formula is just not working. Valuable stuff to know, as the breeder will not be with me 24/7 and the pup is my responsibility as a member of our family, but that's just me. Plus it's my responsibility to know what's best when adulthood comes around as again the pup is my responsibility.

      KAZ

    7. #6
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      Quote Originally Posted by Labradorks View Post
      Feed what works is my advice. Honestly, and I know it may not be the popular sentiment around here, but I believe what you feed matters less than you think. Genetics and weight should be your top concerns, followed by weight and genetics. I once had a very old vet who had been in practice for over 50 years tell me that if a dog is gonna get cancer it's gonna get cancer and most other problems can be avoided or at least not become horribly bad by not letting your dog get fat. Obviously you want to pay attention to general analysis especially protein, fat, calcium, etc. but those can be the appropriate levels for your dog from a grocery store food all the up to the most expensive food.

      That being said, my dogs do eat expensive food. But only because I "enjoy" the smaller poops, the fewer bad farts, they both have allergies to a certain degree, and both have sensitive tummies to some degree as well (lucky me!). I do sometimes worry about things for no particular reason but I try to stay off the food roller coaster because it can be terribly stressful and time consuming. Sometimes I think about supplements but if I'm spending $100+ per month for food and they look and feel great I guess I shouldn't have to. Keeping excess weight off of them is better than any supplement I am aware of.
      Thanks very much, appreciate your view. Expensive dog food, well, have you seen what the people food is lately? Don't know about the enjoyment of smaller poops or fewer bad farts, kind of looking to make sure pup gets the nourishment needed to grow into a healthy adult.

      KAZ

    8. #7
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      Just curious if the breeder has other suggestions, or is it a suggestion of 1.
      If they have other suggestions, do any of them NOT include by-product meal and corn?

    9. #8
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      Quote Originally Posted by ZRabbits View Post
      Thanks very much, appreciate your view. Expensive dog food, well, have you seen what the people food is lately? Don't know about the enjoyment of smaller poops or fewer bad farts, kind of looking to make sure pup gets the nourishment needed to grow into a healthy adult.

      KAZ
      I guess what I'm saying is that nourishment can come from anything that works for your pup and is within the appropriate nutritional guidelines -- whether that's chicken meal or raw, organic, pasture raised, heirloom ostrich with a first and last name. I would feed ProPlan forever if I could because I know it works beautifully for many, many dogs and even got one of my pups through puppyhood successfully before he developed an allergy (environmental as it's getting better with allergy meds), which frankly has not gone away with the new very premium food but I'm madly in love with feeding two dogs one food and it's working for him so I'm going to choose the extra cost over lack of convenience. Small poops and fewer farts are a personal preference.

      My dogs have all grown into healthy adults and I've never (knock on wood) lost one before the age of 16 or had any illnesses or injuries that were not injury or old age related, which I can count on one hand. I fed what was premium at the time but a grocery store food now. My current adult dog with great bloodlines and who's been on premium, holistic, human grade food his whole life is the one I've had the most health issues with, which hasn't been much but certainly more so than all the others.

      My dogs' health, well-being, and longevity are of the utmost importance to me and there are many excellent breeders, pet owners, competitors, judges, trainers, etc. who feel the same and feed foods that are nutritionally complete but not holistic, human grade, or considered ultra premium. At the end of the day it's about personal beliefs, preferences, and experience. I certainly would not judge someone for what their dog eats unless it's not working for their dog and they refuse to change it.

      I, too, have been on the food and supplement roller coaster. In fact I recently spent a large amount of time overthinking supplementing with raw before realizing it wasn't necessary for us.
      Last edited by Labradorks; 06-15-2014 at 04:44 PM.

    10. #9
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      Quote Originally Posted by LucyTudeOn4Feet View Post
      Just curious if the breeder has other suggestions, or is it a suggestion of 1.
      If they have other suggestions, do any of them NOT include by-product meal and corn?
      Didn't ask the breeder for other suggestions yet. My husband wants and has many questions for the breeder regarding the food, which he will do in person at the pup's fifth week. And please don't suggest Purina or Iams, as he was truly disappointed with their product in the past. And no matter what, when some companies fail and then come back, just can't gain that trust back. We have never used the food suggested by the breeder with other dogs. Not thrilled by the by-product either, but not thrilled with soy beans in my rabbit's food. Have to watch my fruits and vegetables because of gmo's. Can't help what regulations are with commercial pet food as meal and corn aren't the only gmo products. Just have to do the best you can. Or go raw and grow your own. Really tough to do with rabbits as you really need land to do so. And supermarkets (mass production) is majority GMO.

      I know food is a sore subject. Not promoting this food. Very impressed with the focus on breed specific, but can't help GMO's as they are everywhere that is regulated by the government.

      Will ask the breeder though. As she has been very open with all my other questions.

      Figured I'd take a walk through google and found these:

      Purina Pro Plan Puppy food. Meal by products, soy bean,
      Shredded Blend Puppy Chicken

      Eukanuba Puppy Food. Made with corn meal
      Eukanuba Large Breed Puppy Dry Dog Food

      This states is free of Corn Meal, So don't know what to think.
      Eukanuba Excel Puppy Chicken Formula Dry Dog Food

      IAMS Puppy Food, made with corn meal
      Iams® ProActive Health™ Smart Puppy Original

      KAZ

    11. #10
      Senior Dog
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      Quote Originally Posted by Labradorks View Post
      I guess what I'm saying is that nourishment can come from anything that works for your pup and is within the appropriate nutritional guidelines -- whether that's chicken meal or raw, organic, pasture raised, heirloom ostrich with a first and last name. I would feed ProPlan forever if I could because I know it works beautifully for many, many dogs and even got one of my pups through puppyhood successfully before he developed an allergy, which frankly has not gone away with the new very premium food but I'm madly in love with feeding two dogs one food and it's working for him so I'm going to choose the extra cost over lack of convenience. Small poops and fewer farts are a personal preference.

      My dogs have all grown into healthy adults and I've never (knock on wood) lost one before the age of 16 or had any illnesses or injuries that were not injury or old age related, which I can count on one hand. I fed what was premium at the time but a grocery store food now. My current adult dog with great bloodlines and who's been on premium, holistic, human grade food his whole life is the one I've had the most health issues with, which hasn't been much but certainly more so than all the others.

      My dogs' health, well-being, and longevity are of the utmost importance to me and there are many excellent breeders, pet owners, competitors, judges, trainers, etc. who feel the same and feed foods that are nutritionally complete but not holistic, human grade, or considered ultra premium. At the end of the day it's about personal beliefs, preferences, and experience. I certainly would not judge someone for what their dog eats unless it's not working for their dog and they refuse to change it.
      Thanks so much. Appreciate you taking the time as I truly understand what you are saying. Agree wholeheartedly about respecting someone's personal beliefs and preferences, and never judging. To each his own. But would appreciate a little tap on the shoulder to ask if something is not right, if that someone actually knew my pup and may have seen weight loss or weight gain.


      KAZ

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