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  • Results 1 to 9 of 9
    1. #1
      Puppy
      Introverse's Avatar
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      4 Month Old labrador pooping and peeing inside behaviour

      Im starting to get worried my lab wont ever learn to do his business outside...I think I do everything accordingly, I take him outside after every nap, meal and overall I take him outside every 2 hours and I reward him every time he pees outside. I stand there for 15 minutes and he does nothing but exploring the world, I understand it is normal for a 4 month old puppie. But he wont pee even when he just sits next to me and of course, we come inside and he pees after a few minutes. It could be because it is winter now and it's cold outside. Well, he does pee outside sometimes and I reward him for it. But I still think he has a habit of just peeing inside

    2. #2
      Senior Dog
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      make sure to clean accidents with odour neutralizing products. and when he DOES go outside, big big party when he finishes. I mean he just solved all of the worlds problems in that moment

      Where is he peeing inside? is he doing it right next to you or sneaking off? How much freedom does he have?
      I would greatly greatly greatly reduce his freedom. if you cannot have your eyes on him he should be crated (assuming he is properly desensitized to a crate) or a small area he will keep clean. Close doors, use baby gates or even tether him to you to ensure he cannot get away to pee.
      Get him on a schedule. Feeding at set times and regular schedule overall to help his bladder fall in line with time.

      Are you taking him outside offleash? I'd keep him leashed so he can't explore wihtout peeing. Do you go for walks? that's a good time to reward the pottying as they tend to potty on walks.

      If he hasn't gone when he was outside and is due to go then he needs ZERO freedom in the house until you go back out and try agan. So on leash next to you wiht your eyes on him or crated (again assuming he is crate trained - you can consider crate training if you haven't already).

      But again make sure to clean all accidents with odour neutralizing product such as htose found in pet stores or vinegar. Regular cleaners leave an odor the dog recognized and will make them associate that as their potty place. if there is a spot he peed often and you can't quite get the smell off (to the dogs nose not yours) then consider feeding him at that spot for the next few weeks).

    3. #3
      House Broken
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      I did what Tanya explained. Sometimes you have to be outside with them for an hour lol. But if you keep it up it will happen
      Sometimes when I was doing house work and I didn't want to leave Brian in his kennel I would just put a leash on him and take him with me. I've done this in the past with my other dogs to. Was easier with the smaller dogs but it worked with Brian too! And I never let him wander around the house. I still don't. He is always within my sight...ALWAYS at least for now.

    4. #4
      Senior Dog
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      oh walking really helps them poop so walks even just in the yard can help

    5. #5
      Senior Dog
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      In addition to the excellent advice given above, if you see him peeing or pooping inside, interrupt him (even just a verbal “hey! don’t do that” or maybe a clap etc), then whisk him outside to finish and make a big deal.

      This was our breeders advice years ago - the reason being that if they know you don’t like it indoors, that is additional information that can be paired with the knowledge that you do like it outdoors. It’s not meant to be a serious correction, just more information.
      Annette

      Cookie (Jamrah’s Legally Blonde, BN) 6/4/2015
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      Remembering:
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    6. #6
      House Broken
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      If he don't go pee/poop, bring him back in and put him in his kennel and wait a few minutes then try again and keep doing that until he does go. Then he can have playtime.

    7. #7
      Puppy
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      I do reward him every time he goes outside. Yes, he does have a spot where he always does his business inside the house, usually if I see him going towards it, I know that he wants to pee, so I take him outside. But he sometimes he still wont pee, even when I stand there for 30 minutes. Inside the house, he has all the freedom he wants but ussually he stays next to someone. I don't have any crate but I'll consider getting it. Not sure my puppie will like it, but what can you do? IM SO TIRED OF MOPPING ALL THE TIME...

    8. #8
      Senior Dog
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      don't just stand there. put a leash on and walk around the yard. the movement will help. Start associating a command.

      if you do get a crate, it's crucial that you take steps to make the dog like it. crate training is not punishing a dog in a cage - it's making the crate a safe spot, THEIR special spot they want to spend time in. start by putting it out and letting the puppy investigate. Feed him in there (door open). Throw in toys for him to find there (you can help him find it). High valu treats. Do many sessions a day - and all this time, do not close the door. you can start closing the door when they get comfortable but start with short periods (a few seconds). make sure to try and time it so puppy is calm before you open the door (so for example, close it while htey are eating. then open it before they finish eating at first). Put a nice blanket in there for htem to take naps in (just be cautious when you start crating them door closed unsupervised they may chew up the blanket so you may have to remove it at that point but for now make the crate as cozy as possible). You NEVER drag or push or force the dog into the crate. You never put them i there as punishment in an angry way. it must always be their safe happy place. reward for being in the crate not when they come out. never open the door when they are barking unless it's an emergency.
      google Susan Garett Crate Games - there are videos you can find online with more info on making the crate a good place.

      restrict his access to the spot he pees at. make sure to clean it with odour neutralizing product. start feeding him there (until you get a crate if you go that route).

    9. #9
      Senior Dog
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      Our first puppies were difficult to housebreak also. And we had another dog who did not seem to understand the concept of going outside until he was 5 months old. It was very frustrating that we would take him outside, he'd pee, then come inside and pee again not 5 minutes later. We did use a crate for him and he was otherwise confined to the kitchen and an adjacent small room that had all tile flooring until he finally figured it out. Some puppies learn more quickly than others. Sometimes taking them out every 2 hours just isn't enough.

      If you get a crate for your puppy, it often helps them with housebreaking, plus it gives them a safe place to be when no one can watch them due to work or school or shopping or other activities you have to do. They usually do not like to do their business where they have to sleep. You make a schedule for his day and try to stick to it so he gets into a good routine. I don't know what season it is in Lithuania right now but regardless of the weather, you just need to commit to taking him outside very frequently so he gets onto a good schedule and has fewer chances to make a mistake inside. At 4 months of age, in theory, he should be able to hold his urine for 4-5 hours and usually all night, but since he's not on a schedule yet, he still needs to work up to that. His schedule could look something like:

      7 am: Take him outside for a brief walk. Feed him his first meal, take him for a walk to let him pee and poop. Return home and play with him for 15-30 minutes, then let him go back into his crate.

      9:30 am: Take him for a walk, during which he will hopefully do his business (yay! what a good boy!). Bring him home and play with him for 15-30 minutes then back into the crate.

      12 noon: Take him outside briefly to see if he needs to go. Bring him in and feed his second meal. Take him for a walk to do his business. Come home and have 15-30 minutes of play time, then back into the crate.

      Mid-afternoon: Take him for a walk, during which he will hopefully do his business. Bring him home and play with him for 15-30 minutes then back into the crate.

      5 pm: Same as noon time.

      7 pm: Same as mid-afternoon

      Bedtime: Walk until he does his business then into the crate to sleep for the night.

      This is a very crate heavy schedule and it's just an example of what you could try. You could also use a small pen inside the house or keep him in the kitchen, preferably on a tile or vinyl floor that can be cleaned easily. If he learns quickly, you can extend the amount of time he stays out of the crate. I would not let him go anywhere he wants in the house until he figures this out.

      If he is not accustomed to being in a crate and you get one, you'll want his crate to be a calm and happy place for him. Avoid the temptation to shove him in there when you're mad about having to clean up after him or he's just chewed up a favorite shoe. Here's one article on crate training that might be helpful. Crate Training Puppies and Dogs | petMD | petMD

      If you can get a cleaner specifically designed to remove pet odors, that should be used to clean the areas where he goes inside. They'll often go where they've gone before if they can smell that they've gone there. In the US, a popular brand is called Nature's Miracle.

      Good luck, it can be tough and frustrating sometimes. One of these days he's sure to figure it out!

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