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    1. #11
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      Quote Originally Posted by Bernie View Post
      Did you even read the OP post? "at wits end", before getting into this positive stuff? everyone is entitled to their opinion, but I'm not going to reward a dog for biting me!
      I'm sorry but how is being "at wits end" an excuse to use punitive dog training? While it may be a stress reliever for the human to be take it out on the dog, it doesn't actually help the dog understand anything. In fact if the dog is asking for ATTENTION you are actually rewarding the biting by giving them what they want (attention - even if it's negative). In fact, a time out is actually "punishment" because you are taking away what the dog wants (you!). This is why I was on the fence with the lip curl (though I have used it and would potentially try it here as well).

      Behaviors like this can rarely be fixed ALONE without also looking at the dog's overall routine. Often it's a symptom of a greater "need".

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    3. #12
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      Like I said before - I'm a fan of the time-out. Bite mommy, lose mommy for a few minutes.
      However, it has often been advised to always have a chew toy handy to put in their mouth to kind of say "here's what you're allowed to chew on; NOT me".
      Sophie: Born July 28, 2014
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    4. #13
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      I think the method you choose also depends on your dog's personality. For me, Jules was extremely resilient. Anytime he encountered anything that scared him (ex: loud popping noise) he recovered quickly. So, if you have a more sensitive dog, then perhaps an approach that's more aggressive is a bad idea. My dog was not sensitive. He always just bounced back quickly and immediately loved you.

    5. #14
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      Quote Originally Posted by annkie View Post
      I think the method you choose also depends on your dog's personality. For me, Jules was extremely resilient. Anytime he encountered anything that scared him (ex: loud popping noise) he recovered quickly. So, if you have a more sensitive dog, then perhaps an approach that's more aggressive is a bad idea. My dog was not sensitive. He always just bounced back quickly and immediately loved you.
      My point is more that the human's emotion (being at witt's end) shouldn't dictate HOW to train. Bernie's post seemed to indicate that BECAUSE the owner was frustrated any positive/less punitive option of training should immediately be disregarded. being frustrated doesn't allow you to be more punitive "Just because". One needs to look at the situation, the cause (what is the dog wanting) and how best to address the issue.

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    7. #15
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      Quote Originally Posted by Tanya View Post
      My point is more that the human's emotion (being at witt's end) shouldn't dictate HOW to train. Bernie's post seemed to indicate that BECAUSE the owner was frustrated any positive/less punitive option of training should immediately be disregarded. being frustrated doesn't allow you to be more punitive "Just because". One needs to look at the situation, the cause (what is the dog wanting) and how best to address the issue.
      Yes, I agree. I was just responding in general, not necessarily to your comment which is why I didn't quote it. That's all.

    8. #16
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      Quote Originally Posted by Tanya View Post
      I'm sorry but how is being "at wits end" an excuse to use punitive dog training? While it may be a stress reliever for the human to be take it out on the dog, it doesn't actually help the dog understand anything. In fact if the dog is asking for ATTENTION you are actually rewarding the biting by giving them what they want (attention - even if it's negative). In fact, a time out is actually "punishment" because you are taking away what the dog wants (you!). This is why I was on the fence with the lip curl (though I have used it and would potentially try it here as well).

      Behaviors like this can rarely be fixed ALONE without also looking at the dog's overall routine. Often it's a symptom of a greater "need".
      So, how about this? Run to the bedroom and lock the door (deny him attention), use this opportunity to bandage up your arms and legs, carefully open door and ask
      if he's "all better", problem solved.

    9. #17
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      Since you shouldn't fix a dog before a year of age, I say use your money saved for that for class and then start a new fund.
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    11. #18
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      Quote Originally Posted by Bernie View Post
      So, how about this? Run to the bedroom and lock the door (deny him attention), use this opportunity to bandage up your arms and legs, carefully open door and ask
      if he's "all better", problem solved.

      Yes that's clearly what I recommended.

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      MontananDakota (04-14-2017)

    13. #19
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      Quote Originally Posted by Bernie View Post
      Did you even read the OP post? "at wits end", before getting into this positive stuff? everyone is entitled to their opinion, but I'm not going to reward a dog for biting me!
      If you knew what you were talking about and actually read the post, you would know that in no way was the method I outlined rewarding a dog for biting.

      Being at wit's end, mad or frustrated should not dictate the type of training you provide to your dog (or child). In fact, if a person is at wit's end, mad or frustrated, it would behoove them to walk away and count to ten before punishing and by then it's too late with a dog.

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    15. #20
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      Quote Originally Posted by SunnySideUp View Post



      I know someone's going to mention puppy classes - and bluntly, I don't have the money to pay for puppy classes. (I've done research into local classes, and they're all out of my budget). On top of that, I've been saving to pay for her getting fixed soon, so money is already allotted for.
      I don't have a suggestion for the biting, other than above. Except that I found getting the toy going as a distraction BEFORE the biting starts was a big help.

      You might want to read at the link and consider when you will spay her. Of course I don't know what you mean by "soon" but I'll guess the common Vet advice of 6 months. If spaying later would work for you then there might be some money for training classes.

      Neuter/Spay - Pros, Cons, Risks, Benefits - Research Article Links

      Good luck.
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      Annette47 (02-02-2017)

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