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    1. #21
      Real Retriever
      silverfz's Avatar
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      gigi gets the zoobies even now and gets real mouthy some time. Espeically the day she goes to day care, which is once a week . all it takes is the empty lavender bottle. i think once i break it out she gets a little less crazy....I have a few empty around the house to control her.
      i actually put a few drops on something and it did not even bother her but i guess she hated it as a puppy and triggers the same response. calm down and stop biting. she more like grabs gently but i hate it as it covers my arms with drool.

    2. #22
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      Bubba bit a lot, my boyfriend was pretty overwhelmed by it. The three things that helped us most were: 1. time (eventually he just stopped) 2. interacting with him in a calm way: doing "puppy massage", not getting him riled up 3. time-outs (honestly more for me than for him), we had a crate & a play pen. this also really helped with his "if i dont get my way im going to bark and whine and be a pest".
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      Bubba's instagram: @thebubbinator

    3. #23
      House Broken
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      Brian was a baaaad biter lol. And just out of the blue he stopped, I have no idea why or how but I'm thankful, those puppy teeth hurt!
      He stopped right at about the 5 month mark I think. And I mean just stopped! Of course it's just me and my husband and we didn't play rough with him or anything.

    4. #24
      Best Friend Retriever
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      Quote Originally Posted by Labradorks View Post
      In fact, if a person is at wit's end, mad or frustrated, it would behoove them to walk away and count to ten before punishing and by then it's too late with a dog.
      example; dog runs in front of moving car...you're right! counted to ten and it's too late! oh well, at least he didn't get yelled at.

    5. #25
      Senior Dog
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      Quote Originally Posted by Bernie View Post
      example; dog runs in front of moving car...you're right! counted to ten and it's too late! oh well, at least he didn't get yelled at.
      If you cannot differentiate between acting when your dog/child/another human is in grave danger and acting when teaching, I am sorry, but I just can't help you. In fact, based on pretty much everything you post here, I am not sure that anyone can.

    6. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Labradorks For This Useful Post:

      Abulafia (03-15-2017), annkie (02-02-2017), Berna (02-05-2017), Doreen Davis (03-24-2017), MontananDakota (04-14-2017), Tanya (02-02-2017)

    7. #26
      Best Friend Retriever
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      Quote Originally Posted by Labradorks View Post
      If you cannot differentiate between acting when your dog/child/another human is in grave danger and acting when teaching, I am sorry, but I just can't help you. In fact, based on pretty much everything you post here, I am not sure that anyone can.
      Just because your textbook rhetoric does not satisfy all questions, situations and people doesn't give you carte blanche to criticize,
      go back and read, I didn't even leave advice for the OP, I just thought annkie's method looked good and was well presented.

    8. #27
      Senior Dog
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      Quote Originally Posted by Bernie View Post
      Just because your textbook rhetoric does not satisfy all questions, situations and people doesn't give you carte blanche to criticize,
      go back and read, I didn't even leave advice for the OP, I just thought annkie's method looked good and was well presented.
      There is no doubt in my mind that my method won't work for every person or dog, just like everyone else's methods wont work for every person or dog. The dog's temperament and the owner must be taken into consideration. To suggest punishment based methods, that can and do go awry, on a message board to a stranger and dog you've never seen or met, is irresponsible. It is not a matter of being touchy feely or positive versus punishment based. To punish a dog that is acting out because his needs are not being met or to assume that the behavior problem is all on the puppy is unfair. In addition to trying to find out more about the situation and making suggestions that are proactive instead of simply reactive, when making suggestions to strangers on the internet, I prefer to make suggestions that are proven to work and cause the least amount of potential issues down the road in the event that the summation of the situation is completely off base. There is no video attached to the OP's post, we don't know the puppy, we don't know the OP, we don't have any idea of the situation and, just like the Bible, everyone's interpretation of the written word is different.

      If you do not agree with people, that is fine, but instead of being an instigator or using examples that are completely irrelevant and way off base to try to prove people -- people who are experienced and trying to help -- wrong, why not add something to the conversation?

    9. #28
      Real Retriever
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      Have you tried tethering him to you and reinforcing sit-down for everything? NILIF? My excitable boy used to leap up from a sit. Down worked much better. I had him sit-down to wait for doors to open, each throw of the ball, for receiving toys/treats, for ear scratches/pets/attention, for meals, for the collar/leash to go on or off. A lot of Downs with kibble rewards (I used his meals) for a week made a huge difference. After that, I phased out the kibble.

      Yelping, turning my back, time outs did not work with Boomer. He was 8 when I adopted him, not a puppy, but he sure acted like a puppy the first three weeks after I brought him home (chomping down on my hands, nippy, mouthy, snatching things from my hands, jumping on/against/at me). Exercise alone wasn't enough either. Interactive toys, fetch, wait-find (the hidden kibble), training sessions all helped. I also kept the pitch of my voice calm & moved with greater deliberation because he was (and still is) an easily over-excitable dog. If I moved quickly or spoke in too high a tone, boom, he'd revert back to his original behaviour.

      I was pretty desperate those first three weeks. I never thought I'd ever give up a dog but, boy, did I come close with Boomer. I'm not a trainer. I just wanted to share what worked for my puppy-like, adult dog in case something there might help (even if only to empathize with the "at wit's end" part).

      I also support the idea of a good trainer who understands labs. I managed to get Boomer to a certain point but my trainer helped me refine his behaviour even more. I'm so glad I stuck with him. He's still a nutbar but he's my nutbar, so that's fine.

      Hang in there.

    10. #29
      Senior Dog
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      Maverick was a biter but Bear wasn't. When Mav got really bad we would put him in his crate with a chew toy. We would leave him in there and let him fall asleep. When he woke up we'd let him out. Sometimes it was 20 minutes, sometimes it was 2 hours. Nothing else worked for him either. Especially yelping as that worked him up even more.


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    11. #30
      Real Retriever
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      OP has yet to post again in this thread !. perfect.

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