• Amused
  • Angry
  • Annoyed
  • Awesome
  • Bemused
  • Cool
  • Crazy
  • Crying
  • Drunk
  • Geeky
  • Grumpy
  • Happy
  • Hungry
  • Innocent
  • Sad
  • Secret
  • Shy
  • Tired
  • Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
    Results 11 to 20 of 20
    1. #11
      Puppy
      puppyinthehouse's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 2017
      Location
      USA
      Posts
      3
      Thanked: 4
      OK, all good stuff. If we let her off the stake outside (and it covers a huge area so she can run with plenty of room!), then she chases the kids and will bite hard, and not let go of clothing. So I am unsure how to help teach her without risking a serious injury to a kid. I DO do this with her and sometimes get bit because I have to teach her. But I am an adult. She bites me and she gets the play bite hold, or I suddenly ignore her so she learns that biting doesn't get her anywhere.

      Her school is top rated and I do go to the school WITH her during class, but that is once a week. The other days we usually choose a few for her to go so she can be with other puppies, etc. This is the last week or so of this though.

      But she is just about outgrown the preschool portion by age. She'll do her 12 day training. After that, should I drop her off one day a week so she can socialize with other dogs under their watch, long-term? It's costly so more than that is a lot...and back and forth is hard with all the kids, driving. But if I don't she will NEVER be around other dogs. We don't have others. Also, I am not a fan of a dog park because I SEE how she is with other dogs and I'd be worried that on my watch she would injure another dog. Plus...unsure of if these dogs are healthy or vaccinated? I assume so but, not sure. Our school has a strict policy for that. People use it as an alternative to daycare. It's like educational daycare, lol, because it is not a free for all, but the dogs continue to brush up on good habits. Training is their focus after all. I know dog's who graduated there and they do great.

      I think I will pay a trainer to come to the home too a few times(this is from another place that does in home) to help us. The catch 22 is how to teach her without risking a child getting really hurt. My 11-year-old's cut was DEEP and it was just a quick bite. We WERE trying to socialize her and not have her in her gate so much. And quickly it gets out of hand. Even if the child is calm and just sitting there. (She by accident ran into the other room and a 3 YO was asleep on the couch and he woke screaming with the dog biting him. No marks...and I was right there to stop it.) Yikes! Before I let her out I feel I have to place the little kids on the kitchen table! And they want to do this. They are afraid of her.

      Quote Originally Posted by smartrock View Post
      OK, so that behavior is pretty common in young lab puppies. Not desirable, obviously, but they typically outgrow it with a LOT of reinforcement.Those nice calm labs you see in movies or on TV are not puppies, they've outgrown the biting, nipping, jumping baby puppy phase. There are some behaviors you can teach your children that might help in the meantime. Your older kids for sure should be able to do this, the younger ones will learn but any interaction with the puppy and your littles will need to be closely supervised until puppy gets older and more under control.

      Use the SAFE Program to learn about dog bite prevention

      I wouldn't feel too bad about putting the puppy in her gated area for rests frequently through out the day. My puppies have always been on a pretty strict wake/rest/feeding schedule, just like I would a baby/toddler human. I don't know what I think about having the puppy on the tie out with the kids running around, I'd probably keep the puppy inside so she doesn't get so worked up watching the kids and take her out for play time separately or with your older kids who will learn not to reinforce her jumping, nipping behavior. Our older boy was bad about running at us and jumping, mouth open. I learned to spin away from him when he did this but encourage him to keep running to help get the excessive energy out.

      Shelley posed while I was writing this. I agree with everything she said.

    2. #12
      Senior Dog
      zd262's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2015
      Location
      California
      Posts
      885
      Thanked: 479
      Yes the land shark phase, not fun! I thought it would never end but he really did just grow out of it eventually. The big thing that helped for us was to always interact with him in a calm way. Don't run around, don't "rough house" (or rile him up). If he starts to be wound up, stand up and step away or soothe with long slow strokes. And yes, those teeth are very sharp. Luckily they should start to fall out soon

      I don't have kids so I can't speak to the experience of raising a puppy around them, but I would think that you would really need to work on the being calm part. Yes if they're running and shrieking around the puppy (which I'm sure they are because that's totally normal!), its definitely going to get the puppy riled up. Be calm around the puppy, and if you want to play, put the puppy away in a safe space. Crating our puppy honestly saved me from a mental breakdown haha. It is good for the puppy and it is good for you. It sounds like at this stage unless you are watching the puppy 100% it should be in a crate or gated area. Definitely fully supervise ANY interaction with your kids.

      I'm not sure on all the details of the school, it sounds like she is spending a lot of time there. I would say that you should sign up for a weekly (or multiple time a week) class that you take the dog to. This will make sure that she gets some socialization and that she continues her training. As far as the dog park goes, I don't think you need to worry about her hurting other dogs, but I would worry about other dogs hurting her. A lot of dogs give puppies a "pass" for their annoying behavior (such as all this biting!) but there are ones who don't and they have teeth that aren't just sharp but can do real damage. Also at 14 weeks she must have just finished her vaccinations or maybe not be totally done? Definitely not a safe spot for a puppy. I would see if you can arrange playdates with other similar puppies at the school she goes to, the trainers there might have recommendations.

      It will definitely get better though! I was still occasionally on the verge of tears over frustration at 14 weeks...and now Bubba is amazing.
      Hidden Content


      Bubba's instagram: @thebubbinator

    3. #13
      Senior Dog
      Labradorks's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2014
      Location
      USA
      Posts
      3,388
      Thanked: 1914
      I know kids are hard to train but can you ask the kids not to run and scream? That gets any dog going! My dogs are well-trained and 4 and 7 years old but I can guarantee you that if we are in a field and a kid screams and runs, they are thinking "GAME ON!". Now, they are trained well enough that I can call them back before they reach the kid and I am trained well enough to recognize a potential issue and call them in BEFORE it becomes a problem. Every time your kids scream and run and the dog chases, barks, etc., that behavior is reinforced and the behavior becomes stronger. If the kids are on the table and they are screaming and acting up out of fear, the dog probably finds this reinforcing as well. Eventually she is going to be bigger and able to jump on the table with them.

      If it were me, I'd work on impulse control separately of the kids. Eventually you can teach her that when she feels the need to run/chase, she can turn back to you for a better reward, but you have to control her environment so she cannot get to the thing(s) and self-reward. You have to start slow, say with her kibble and then build up. With kids, you really need to help the puppy be successful. I'd have her tethered to me and do lots of rewarding for calm behavior, especially around the children. If she is crated, put a frozen Kong in there or some other tasty treat that she has to work for and do not let the kids bug her or be rambunctious while she is in there. If you are outside, maybe you play with her with something else, like a flirt pole? And have her on a long line.

      Honestly, I don't think sending her away to school is going to help because she's is such a young puppy and where they are and where you are is incredibly different. I would think an in-home trainer once a week would be more helpful, maybe a trainer who is good with kids also, because it sounds like your kids need help in how to deal with a puppy. And yes, this is pretty normal of a Lab puppy. I cannot tell you how many kids are afraid of their family puppies. If trained, the puppy turns into a dog and all is forgotten, but it takes time and effort of the whole family.

    4. The Following User Says Thank You to Labradorks For This Useful Post:

      Annette47 (10-13-2017)

    5. #14
      Chief Pooper Scooper
      JenC's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      Colorado
      Posts
      2,161
      Thanked: 2119
      The kids need to learn NOT to scream and run. Rather they tuck in arms tight, and turn their back to the pup. Sorry that the breeder did not explain to you that lab PUPPIES are terrors. People see adult dogs, well-trained and past the puppy phase and think they come like that from the get go. Puppies are like adding a new 2 year old to the household, and they will require more attention than the human children. I usually don't place puppies in households with kids unless the family is already very dog savvy and/or has had a lab before.
      Jen & Tickle!
      Hidden Content

    6. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to JenC For This Useful Post:

      Annette47 (10-13-2017), Labradorks (10-08-2017), windycanyon (10-08-2017)

    7. #15
      Best Friend Retriever
      Anna Scott's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 2014
      Location
      Canada
      Posts
      458
      Thanked: 154
      Thank you Jen C I thought I was the only one that didn't place puppies in homes with children under 6 or 7. I don't want the pup to become another responsibility for mom which it sounds like in this case. When the kids are running and paying in the yard put the pup somewhere else. I would have the kids lean to walk the pup on a leash in a quiet manner. The OP might benefit from reading Brian Kilcommon's book Good Owners Great Dogs or Rutherford and Rutherford's How to Raise a Puppy You Can Live With. I have a 16 week old right now. The vet said something to me when we were in for shots. Puppies explore their environment and boundaries orally so you must expect this behavior and be ready to deal with it. This has been true of every lab puppy I have had over the last 25 years.

    8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Anna Scott For This Useful Post:

      barry581 (10-08-2017), windycanyon (10-08-2017)

    9. #16
      Senior Dog
      kimbersmom's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      SW Virginia
      Posts
      1,502
      Thanked: 1292
      Quote Originally Posted by Anna Scott View Post
      Thank you Jen C I thought I was the only one that didn't place puppies in homes with children under 6 or 7. I don't want the pup to become another responsibility for mom which it sounds like in this case. When the kids are running and paying in the yard put the pup somewhere else. I would have the kids lean to walk the pup on a leash in a quiet manner. The OP might benefit from reading Brian Kilcommon's book Good Owners Great Dogs or Rutherford and Rutherford's How to Raise a Puppy You Can Live With. I have a 16 week old right now. The vet said something to me when we were in for shots. Puppies explore their environment and boundaries orally so you must expect this behavior and be ready to deal with it. This has been true of every lab puppy I have had over the last 25 years.
      I read a fascinating/horrifying study from years and years ago where the researchers took two puppies from the same litter. One was allowed to explore its world, while the other was confined and had the world introduced to it. Things did not end well for the non-explorer. I remember a big point being the confined critter wasn't allowed to mouth items, which ended up severely impacting its development.
      Miss Kimber, CGC, birthdate 6/15/2005

      Hidden Content

    10. #17
      Senior Dog
      windycanyon's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2014
      Location
      C. WA
      Posts
      1,359
      Thanked: 1003
      Anna, you are not alone at all.... and I've taken some flack for having the same philosophy. Furthermore, 6yr olds today (even even some 12 yo kids I've had visit recently) are borderline on maturity imo.

      I took flack from a conformation instructor a few months ago for not allowing Pippin (now 8 mos) to partake in puppy social/ play after our show ring sessions. My feeling on that is if she was well socialized by 8 wks, she really needs no more play w/ strange dogs. All that teaches them is that school is basically all play and no work. Of course I have my own pack here, so that does make it a little different but she is already so much further ahead of the pups that did all that romper room stuff as far as maturity, knowing when it's "work time" w/ mom, etc. I start constructive obedience very early on and by your pup's age, my pup had been to several hunt tests, obedience trials etc so quiet crating manners were well instilled. I can't say Pippin is as far along at 8 mos as Kanzi but she's not bad considering my limited time.

      This pup IMO is screaming for a job to do. She has no idea what her role is in the family apparently. Has no respect. I handle biting probably a lot firmer than most here but I start putting the kibosh to it at 5-6 wks when they are still with me. That doesn't mean once puppies leave, they won't test their limits, but I can't raise the puppy for the new owners once they leave. I do give my owners instructions on dealing w/ it in a no- nonsense fashion. I say NO-- Leave It!!! and slip the jowl right under their canine and make them feel it for themselves. Some will say that is cruel, however, your children are bleeding... and by the sounds of it, they don't like the puppy already. I'm very sad for the puppy to not have CLEAR rules to live by. Sending it off to a stranger's place is probably just confusing her more.

      JMO. Currently raising pup #15 (I think??? other than a couple more that I raised thru 4mos...). Best of luck. Anne




      Quote Originally Posted by Anna Scott View Post
      Thank you Jen C I thought I was the only one that didn't place puppies in homes with children under 6 or 7. I don't want the pup to become another responsibility for mom which it sounds like in this case. When the kids are running and paying in the yard put the pup somewhere else. I would have the kids lean to walk the pup on a leash in a quiet manner. The OP might benefit from reading Brian Kilcommon's book Good Owners Great Dogs or Rutherford and Rutherford's How to Raise a Puppy You Can Live With. I have a 16 week old right now. The vet said something to me when we were in for shots. Puppies explore their environment and boundaries orally so you must expect this behavior and be ready to deal with it. This has been true of every lab puppy I have had over the last 25 years.
      Hidden Content
      The WindyCanyon Girls, Fall 2016
      IntCh WindyCanyon's Ruby Pink BN CD RA CC (2.5 yrs)
      IntCH WindyCanyon's Envy CDX RE JH CC (8.5 yrs)
      IntCH WindyCanyon Patent Nfringement CDX RA JH CC (11 yrs)
      IntCH WindyCanyon's Northern Spy CDX RA JH OA OAJ CC (12.5 yrs)
      IntCH WindyCanyon's Kanzi BN CDX RE JH (3 yrs)
      IntCH HIT WindyCanyon's Kiku A Fuji Too CDX RE JH CC (8 yrs)
      IntCH WindyCanyon's SweeTango CD RA JH CC (7 yrs)






    11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to windycanyon For This Useful Post:

      Annette47 (10-13-2017), barry581 (10-09-2017)

    12. #18
      Moderator
      barry581's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      Dover
      Posts
      5,334
      Thanked: 4797
      My grandson was 3 when Sophie arrived. I kept Sophie on leash when he came to visit, and I told him the rules he had to follow while here. 1. No running. 2. No squeaky or high pitched noises. 3. If Sophie came up to him and jumped up, he was to turn away, and not make eye contact. I know that's a lot to ask of a 3 year old, but he did as he was told, and he and Sophie became fast friends.

      My own kids were 3 and 4 when I got my first Lab puppy. It was a bit tough at times, and there was no internet to find info, I just went with my gut and we all got through it.

      Personally, I've tried more methods recommended here for the biting, and I found the lip curl over a canine tooth to be the quickest and most effective way to correct the problem.

    13. #19
      Real Retriever
      silverfz's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2016
      Location
      MASS
      Posts
      440
      Thanked: 124
      Welcome . Gigi was a land shark from 10 weeks till about 6 months

      When the zombies come we used
      Vicks in the kids ankles .

      Our trainer turned us to lavender oil. I would put it on my hand when the nuts come off.

      The awesome side effect it is it calms them long term and short term the smell and taste makes then not nip or bite any where it is.

      When she got nippy the trainer will put a drop in her mouth...

      Then I also made a mix of apple vineger ,regular vinegar to spray the wires and furniture she would thing can be destroyed.

      Alot of chew.toys , bully sticks and bones.


      One of my neighbours tried it on her two German Shepard pups and same effect. She still get a little naughty and mouthy at times..all I do is show her the empty bottle and she calms down even fully grown.

      It's a great portable correction tool for us. When she challenges any of us in her young age I would just take the bottle out and see a change immediately.


      Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk

    14. #20
      Senior Dog
      Annette47's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      Central NJ
      Posts
      2,086
      Thanked: 1856
      Quote Originally Posted by windycanyon View Post
      Anna, you are not alone at all.... and I've taken some flack for having the same philosophy. Furthermore, 6yr olds today (even even some 12 yo kids I've had visit recently) are borderline on maturity imo.

      I took flack from a conformation instructor a few months ago for not allowing Pippin (now 8 mos) to partake in puppy social/ play after our show ring sessions. My feeling on that is if she was well socialized by 8 wks, she really needs no more play w/ strange dogs. All that teaches them is that school is basically all play and no work. Of course I have my own pack here, so that does make it a little different but she is already so much further ahead of the pups that did all that romper room stuff as far as maturity, knowing when it's "work time" w/ mom, etc. I start constructive obedience very early on and by your pup's age, my pup had been to several hunt tests, obedience trials etc so quiet crating manners were well instilled. I can't say Pippin is as far along at 8 mos as Kanzi but she's not bad considering my limited time.

      This pup IMO is screaming for a job to do. She has no idea what her role is in the family apparently. Has no respect. I handle biting probably a lot firmer than most here but I start putting the kibosh to it at 5-6 wks when they are still with me. That doesn't mean once puppies leave, they won't test their limits, but I can't raise the puppy for the new owners once they leave. I do give my owners instructions on dealing w/ it in a no- nonsense fashion. I say NO-- Leave It!!! and slip the jowl right under their canine and make them feel it for themselves. Some will say that is cruel, however, your children are bleeding... and by the sounds of it, they don't like the puppy already. I'm very sad for the puppy to not have CLEAR rules to live by. Sending it off to a stranger's place is probably just confusing her more.

      JMO. Currently raising pup #15 (I think??? other than a couple more that I raised thru 4mos...). Best of luck. Anne
      I agree with all of this, but have to say I am a little concerned that this puppy is biting hard enough to draw blood ... all of mine had better bite inhibition than that, even the ones we didn’t raise from day 1, so while they were quite mouthy and annoying, there was never any bleeding from it other than perhaps a minor scratch. I do use the lip curl (fold their lip over their tooth so they can see how it feels) and for mine, a quick OUCH!, a verbal “NO BITE”, while taking my hand away and standing up and ending any play session also proved helpful in teaching them they were biting harder than was comfortable. It’s also important to watch the dog and intervene before it gets so worked up and excited it can’t listen - they are like toddlers. When they get overtired and over stimulated they can get hyper and unable to listen. Time-outs are helpful for both humans and dogs.

      I do think that the OP may have taken on too much with that many young kids and a puppy. The best behavior comes from building a relationship with the dog and that has to be done by the owner, not by an outside trainer, and takes time. A trainer can show the owner what to do, but the owner has to be the one to teach the dog.

      My competition Obedience dogs work beautifully for me, but if my husband asks them to do something, it is half-hearted and sloppy because he’s not the one that built that kind of relationship. His relationship is more “listen a little bit and I’ll give you anything you want” while mine has higher expectations.
      Annette

      Cookie (Jamrah’s Legally Blonde, BN) 6/4/2015
      Sassy (Jamrah’s Blonde Ambition, BN) 6/4/2015

      Chloe (HIT HC Windsong’s Femme Fatale, UDX2, OM4) 6/7/2009


      Remembering:
      Scully (Coventry's Truth Is Out There, UD, RN) 4/4/1996 - 6/30/2011
      Our foster Jolie (UCh Windsong’s Genuine Risk, CDX, WC) 5/26/1999 - 3/2/2014
      and Mulder (Coventry’s I Want to Believe, UD, VER, WC, RN) 5/26/1999 - 4/20/2015

      Hidden Content

    Quick Reply Quick Reply

     



    Not a Member of the Labrador Retriever Chat Forums Yet?
    Register for Free and Share Your Labrador Retriever Photos

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •