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    1. #1
      Puppy
      puppyinthehouse's Avatar
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      puppy biting, bleeding wounds HELP!

      Our 14-month-old English female chocolate lab bites ALL the time. We got her at 8 weeks. She goes to school almost all day every day with the trainers because I WANT THEM TO WORK ON THE BITING, and it is a potty-training program (so that too, of course). At home, she tries to bite me even though I do play bite hold like the trainers taught me.
      She runs and jumps at the kids and catches their skin and has caused deep bleeding wounds. And the kids stay on the couch. They are afraid of her. I have started placing them on the table to protect them during her play.

      Soon she will start the more serious obedience training (a 12 day full-day program). The biting she doesn't do so much at school because there are no kids for one, and also there are other puppies. She does not find biting the trainers so interesting since she is busy playing. She bites the other puppies with her play (as dogs do) but really gets into it...so when I go to the preschool family time I see the trainer holds her leash. Many of the other dogs don't need to have this done. They are not really such biters.

      I thought this was a great family pet? She only gets a few supervised times around the house per day (if I am sure she has peed or pooed already outside) and I feel bad she spends most of her time in a gated octagon gate (but really many her age are in crates all day; she is only in the crate at night). She gets lots of outside time on a stake with room to roam (but even though we have a fence she would maul the kids so she is on the stake, and the kids play in the yard but she cannot bite them this way. There are 7 kids ages 2 to 11 and now I wonder if what we got ourselves into...if the kids will ever be safe. She really bit the 11-year-old hard today. Lots of blood. It's all in play, but...

      Does anyone else have this problem? How come the breeder was so patient with me and taught me a TON about dogs (this is my first) and did not even MENTION biting? How long does this last? We are already spending hundreds on school. What else should we do???? Or is this normal?

    2. #2
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      If the dog truly is 14 MONTHS old you've got a real problem on your hands. If the dog is 14 WEEKS, it's pretty normal. Before I give any input I'd want to know the correct age.

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    4. #3
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      Tanya's Avatar
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      yes can we confirm the dog is 14 months (not weeks?)

      how long was the dog in this "training program"? are they actual trainers? hw long is she there for? The problem with training is there is zero regulations. Anyone can call themselves a trainer and get a few people to recommend them. it can be hard to really tell the good from the uneducated ones.

      If the dog is indeed 14 months and is either in a gated area or tied to a stake then I'd say at this point a large part of hte isuse is lack of exercise both physical and mental and not enough time training on how to behave (while containment and management are important, the less time they are with your and being trained the longer it takes).

      One issue with labs is they seriously overbred. most popular breed in america. and just being "purebred" doesn't really speak to a dog's personality and temperment. These are accomplished via careful breeding. Furthermore, there are some lines (field or american lines) being bred for field competitions - these dogs, while completely 100% pure bred lab, require tons and tons more physical and mental exercise).

      One good stop biting link: How to train your puppy not to bite - YouTube

      What I would do:
      Get an age appropriate exercise routine (this will vary depending if the dog is 14 weeks or 14 months - i will go into more detail on what a 14 MONTH old lab shuld get as that is what you wrote): a young lab needs at least an hour of running and playing a day. each day. if the dogs can't do that nicely with the kids at this point it means ne of the adults in the home must do it. I assume off leash hikes and such trips won't work so look at fetching and playing in the yard. Ideally some play dates with other dogs. I'd also get some daily walks in to get the dog to smell some new smells
      MENTAL exercise is HUGELY important as well. I would have this dog work for all meals either via training or toys like a stuff kong or interactive toys. there are TONS some you can DIY for cheap and others you can buy at most pet stores now. I would also included 3 short training sessions a day (can be 5 minutes each!)

      Then I would not use any of the board and trains as you don't seem to be getting the results and it doesn't help you with the kids and dog issue. What I WOULD look for is a qualified educated trainer that is especially good with families and kids to do some at home sessions. Training the kids will be as important as training the dog A few sessions at home should be cheaper than any board and train. They will give YOU the tools to work with the dog. Then I'd get into some basic obedience classes.

      ETA: if the puppy is only 14 weeks then the exercise plan would be made age appropriate more shorter play in the yard, play dates, shorter walks.
      Last edited by Tanya; 10-07-2017 at 08:44 PM.

    5. #4
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      Sounds like a 4 month old and if 4 months is correct, it's not that uncommon for a young lab. Did you see our thread on biting? I'll try to link to it here.

      Puppy biting!

      The biting may improve once her adult teeth come in. Seven kids is a lot of excitement for a youngster, the running, the laughing, the playing, the squealing. We lost several pieces of clothing and looked like we'd been in a shark attack with our first lab, who we got at 8 weeks of age. Our second we got at 12 weeks and the biting was much less but not absent. Yes, labs can be terrific family pets but the young puppy phase can be very difficult.
      Last edited by smartrock; 10-07-2017 at 09:27 PM.

    6. #5
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      Labradorks's Avatar
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      14 months, as in 1 year and two months? Or 14 weeks as in 3.5 months?

    7. #6
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      Boy, I sure hope it's 14 weeks...
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      Sunnie: gotcha day 03/08/09; birth unknown but given 07/01/02

      Danny: The Sundance Kid....Sunnie's boy....birth 03/31/09 (in my living room)

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    8. #7
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      At four months old, Asher was a little biting machine. At 10.5 months old, he doesn't bite in the manner he used to. He tries to mouth my entire arm at times but doesn't bite down really. Just leaves a bunch of drool. You have a future best friend and protector to all your children on your hands. Biting is all a part of a lab pup. Asher caught my finger one time and it sliced my fingertip. I had to go to urgent care and get glued (I refused stitches in my fingertip). I purchased some Young's essential oil and kept on my hands and arms. Asher never went for my ankles or feet. I think I ordered wintergreen? He didn't like it. At first I tried lavender but he actually liked it. Once those puppy teeth fall out, it gets so much better. There were times when Asher was trying to bite me and I'd put my finger toward the back of his tongue. He'd gag and stop the biting. He was a heavy biter and I tried so many different things. Read over this board, the article posted above, etc. My arms looked like a race track of bad nights. I wore long sleeves to work! Hang in there. You took the right step in posting here. So much knowledge. I've learned a great deal from the kind members on this board.

      7 kids, 7 puppies (just for example)--- is there really a difference in the puppies eyes if they are human or fur pups? I don't think so. Just my thought -- your puppy is running around with lots of other puppies biting and having a puppy of a good time. Puppy gets home to little kids running around being loud (kid loud), having fun, running. What's puppy going to do? Act just like she does with the puppies at school. How often and long does she go to school? Not so sure all that running around with the other pups is the best idea given your number of children. Socialization is very important, don't get me wrong. She has a large pack of "pups" at home too so she just continues the play at home.

      GOOD LUCK!

      Edited to add: Post a picture of the cute pup!!
      Last edited by SamsonsMom; 10-08-2017 at 06:48 AM.

    9. #8
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      14 weeks

      I meant 14 weeks, yes.

      Quote Originally Posted by puppyinthehouse View Post
      Our 14-month-old English female chocolate lab bites ALL the time. We got her at 8 weeks. She goes to school almost all day every day with the trainers because I WANT THEM TO WORK ON THE BITING, and it is a potty-training program (so that too, of course). At home, she tries to bite me even though I do play bite hold like the trainers taught me.
      She runs and jumps at the kids and catches their skin and has caused deep bleeding wounds. And the kids stay on the couch. They are afraid of her. I have started placing them on the table to protect them during her play.

      Soon she will start the more serious obedience training (a 12 day full-day program). The biting she doesn't do so much at school because there are no kids for one, and also there are other puppies. She does not find biting the trainers so interesting since she is busy playing. She bites the other puppies with her play (as dogs do) but really gets into it...so when I go to the preschool family time I see the trainer holds her leash. Many of the other dogs don't need to have this done. They are not really such biters.

      I thought this was a great family pet? She only gets a few supervised times around the house per day (if I am sure she has peed or pooed already outside) and I feel bad she spends most of her time in a gated octagon gate (but really many her age are in crates all day; she is only in the crate at night). She gets lots of outside time on a stake with room to roam (but even though we have a fence she would maul the kids so she is on the stake, and the kids play in the yard but she cannot bite them this way. There are 7 kids ages 2 to 11 and now I wonder if what we got ourselves into...if the kids will ever be safe. She really bit the 11-year-old hard today. Lots of blood. It's all in play, but...

      Does anyone else have this problem? How come the breeder was so patient with me and taught me a TON about dogs (this is my first) and did not even MENTION biting? How long does this last? We are already spending hundreds on school. What else should we do???? Or is this normal?

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    11. #9
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      14 weeks is a tough time, but the puppy needs to learn her boundaries, and they do not come as great family pets, they have the potential to be great family dogs, but they need to be raised to become a great family pet, with love, patience and fairness.

      Also, You need to work on the biting, and training, etc... sending her away to a training facility will only train her to work for the people training her, because she respect them, if you do not train her at home, she knows she can get away with doing what she wants.

      You need to make her part of the family, and give her more time outside of her ex pen, to learn the correct way to interact with your family, training doesn't happen at certain times, it is continuous throughout the day. Staking outside is a good way to ruin a puppy, as it leads to aggression and leash reactiveness, plus she is not learning how to interact and play safely with the kids. It is better to tether them to you, so you have control, and can correct them because you have them leashed. This works inside and outside.

      Disclaimer, I am a Labrador breeder. Firstly with 7 kids ages ranging from 12-11 years, I would have been cautious to sell you a puppy, and we would have gone through some extensive discussions about how you were going to deal with young children and a new puppy. I also would have steered you towards an older puppy/young adult since this is your first dog. Next, I prepare my families, and warn them that the first few weeks/months they are going to have buyers remorse, the puppy is almost as much work as an infant, they need to pee/poo on a schedule, get out down for naps on a schedule, fed on a schedule, crate trained, potty trained, housebroken, taught house manners and basic obedience, socialized safely and frequently, on and on, and on... They bite, they jump, they play, ... and the need to be taught how to behave. But once you get through the first year or so, and you have worked hard with your puppy, you will have a great companion.

      My suggestion would be to take the puppy to obedience classes yourself, with a good dog training club or school, not a Petsmart or pet store class. Your puppy is young and is still moldable to be the dog you want, but you and your family need to make a commitment to her. This will not get better with time, on its own, she will just be bigger and stronger and out of control, and this is why a lot of puppies are taken to a shelter or rehomed around 6-8 months old. If you think you are in over your head, there is absolutely no shame in contacting your breeder for either help, or to return her.

      Good luck to you and keep us posted.

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    13. #10
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      OK, so that behavior is pretty common in young lab puppies. Not desirable, obviously, but they typically outgrow it with a LOT of reinforcement.Those nice calm labs you see in movies or on TV are not puppies, they've outgrown the biting, nipping, jumping baby puppy phase. There are some behaviors you can teach your children that might help in the meantime. Your older kids for sure should be able to do this, the younger ones will learn but any interaction with the puppy and your littles will need to be closely supervised until puppy gets older and more under control.

      Use the SAFE Program to learn about dog bite prevention

      I wouldn't feel too bad about putting the puppy in her gated area for rests frequently through out the day. My puppies have always been on a pretty strict wake/rest/feeding schedule, just like I would a baby/toddler human. I don't know what I think about having the puppy on the tie out with the kids running around, I'd probably keep the puppy inside so she doesn't get so worked up watching the kids and take her out for play time separately or with your older kids who will learn not to reinforce her jumping, nipping behavior. Our older boy was bad about running at us and jumping, mouth open. I learned to spin away from him when he did this but encourage him to keep running to help get the excessive energy out.

      Shelley posed while I was writing this. I agree with everything she said.

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