• Amused
  • Angry
  • Annoyed
  • Awesome
  • Bemused
  • Cool
  • Crazy
  • Crying
  • Drunk
  • Geeky
  • Grumpy
  • Happy
  • Hungry
  • Innocent
  • Sad
  • Secret
  • Shy
  • Tired
  • Results 1 to 7 of 7
    1. #1
      Puppy
      gplouchard's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 2017
      Location
      Indiana
      Posts
      3
      Thanked: 0

      How to train 2 pups that are brother's

      I have 2 pups currently 6 months and 65 lbs. Looking for ideas to train them to keep from digging out from under a 5' chain link fence. They have 1.5 acres fenced and large pond and some woods to roam. But prefer to dig out of fence?

      Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk

    2. #2
      Senior Dog
      Shelley's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      United States
      Posts
      1,000
      Thanked: 1376
      Hi, how did you acquire litter mate brothers? Did a breeder sell them to you? If so they might (or might not) have advice for you. Most reputable breeders do not sell litter mates because of 'litter-mate syndrome" you can Google that term to learn more about it.

      Are the boys outside all of the time. Do they ever come inside. Do you have (separate) training sessions with them daily? Sorry about all the questions, but this happens a lot and most people have no idea what they have gotten themselves into, until this age, when they have wild 6 month old naughty puppies. One of the major reasons Labradors this age (6 months and up) end up at the shelter or on Craigslist.

      If they are outside by themselves all the time, you will have to build them a safer structure, like a kennel with concrete blocks to prevent them digging out, for their safety; and supervise their free time in the yard since they have learned, and rewarded themselves, with breaking out.

    3. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Shelley For This Useful Post:

      Annette47 (12-19-2017), gplouchard (12-18-2017), Tanya (12-18-2017), windycanyon (12-16-2017)

    4. #3
      Senior Dog
      windycanyon's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2014
      Location
      C. WA
      Posts
      1,409
      Thanked: 1036
      I'll second what Shelley wrote, though I will add that 8 - 9 mos has been FAR worse for "adolescence" than 6mos so I think you have your work cut out for you. A bored lab is a bad lab so I'd really encourage you to get into some individual training classes w/ the pups. I raised littermates about 13 yrs ago, and even though mine were fairly mellow labs, it was nearly a full time job that first 8-10 mos to give them the structure and 1 on 1 time they needed.

      I'd also reconsider so much freedom outside. I have 5 fenced acres here and fortunately mine have no desires (typically-- unless there is a squeaking sage rat on the fenceline!) to dig but I also either crate or kennel if I'm not home.

      If this isn't possible, you could look into stringing a low hot wire along your fence. Anne
      Hidden Content
      The WindyCanyon Girls, Fall 2016
      IntCh WindyCanyon's Ruby Pink BN CD RA CC (2.5 yrs)
      IntCH WindyCanyon's Envy CDX RE JH CC (8.5 yrs)
      IntCH WindyCanyon Patent Nfringement CDX RA JH CC (11 yrs)
      IntCH WindyCanyon's Northern Spy CDX RA JH OA OAJ CC (12.5 yrs)
      IntCH WindyCanyon's Kanzi BN CDX RE JH (3 yrs)
      IntCH HIT WindyCanyon's Kiku A Fuji Too CDX RE JH CC (8 yrs)
      IntCH WindyCanyon's SweeTango CD RA JH CC (7 yrs)






    5. The Following User Says Thank You to windycanyon For This Useful Post:

      Tanya (12-18-2017)

    6. #4
      Senior Dog
      Shelley's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      United States
      Posts
      1,000
      Thanked: 1376
      Quote Originally Posted by windycanyon View Post
      I'll second what Shelley wrote, though I will add that 8 - 9 mos has been FAR worse for "adolescence" than 6mos so I think you have your work cut out for you.
      ...

      Exactly! Which is why is said 6 months and up...
      Quote Originally Posted by Shelley View Post
      Sorry about all the questions, but this happens a lot and most people have no idea what they have gotten themselves into, until this age, when they have wild 6 month old naughty puppies. One of the major reasons Labradors this age (6 months and up) end up at the shelter or on Craigslist.

    7. #5
      Puppy
      gplouchard's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 2017
      Location
      Indiana
      Posts
      3
      Thanked: 0
      Quote Originally Posted by Shelley View Post
      Hi, how did you acquire litter mate brothers? Did a breeder sell them to you? If so they might (or might not) have advice for you. Most reputable breeders do not sell litter mates because of 'litter-mate syndrome" you can Google that term to learn more about it.

      Are the boys outside all of the time. Do they ever come inside. Do you have (separate) training sessions with them daily? Sorry about all the questions, but this happens a lot and most people have no idea what they have gotten themselves into, until this age, when they have wild 6 month old naughty puppies. One of the major reasons Labradors this age (6 months and up) end up at the shelter or on Craigslist.

      If they are outside by themselves all the time, you will have to build them a safer structure, like a kennel with concrete blocks to prevent them digging out, for their safety; and supervise their free time in the yard since they have learned, and rewarded themselves, with breaking out.
      I do not let the boys run without someone being home. They are crate trained and for the most part house broken. Other than the digging I don't have issues, they behave well and I do work with them. I got them from a co-worker.

      Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk

    8. #6
      Senior Dog
      Tanya's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      Eastern Ontario Canada
      Posts
      3,006
      Thanked: 1790
      Digging is a very normal and natural dog activity. Self-rewarding even (it's fun!)

      The best bet to get on top of it is to be out there iwth them. Supervise and redirect. If they dig interrupt and find another activity for them to do. I'd use kikopup's positive interrupter (she kikopups' youtube page).

      One thing that works for some is to have a digging area.an area they can dig. can be a kiddy pool of dirt or sand or area in the yard. Redirect to that spot each time. Bury toys for them to find and make that the go to digging space.
      Now this won't work as well if they are digging specifically to get out or digging for bigs and such. but if it's just random digging his can help. You need to be out there and constantly redirecting for the first while.

      You can also bury chicken wire so they can't get thru (from under the fence and then deeper in the the dirt).

      Having other things for them to do outside helps, limiting their time outside unattended and ensuring they get plenty of physical and mental exercise daily (work those brains!)

    9. The Following User Says Thank You to Tanya For This Useful Post:

      gplouchard (12-18-2017)

    10. #7
      Puppy
      gplouchard's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 2017
      Location
      Indiana
      Posts
      3
      Thanked: 0
      Quote Originally Posted by Tanya View Post
      Digging is a very normal and natural dog activity. Self-rewarding even (it's fun!)

      The best bet to get on top of it is to be out there iwth them. Supervise and redirect. If they dig interrupt and find another activity for them to do. I'd use kikopup's positive interrupter (she kikopups' youtube page).

      One thing that works for some is to have a digging area.an area they can dig. can be a kiddy pool of dirt or sand or area in the yard. Redirect to that spot each time. Bury toys for them to find and make that the go to digging space.
      Now this won't work as well if they are digging specifically to get out or digging for bigs and such. but if it's just random digging his can help. You need to be out there and constantly redirecting for the first while.

      You can also bury chicken wire so they can't get thru (from under the fence and then deeper in the the dirt).

      Having other things for them to do outside helps, limiting their time outside unattended and ensuring they get plenty of physical and mental exercise daily (work those brains!)
      Good info, I put down chicken wire this past weekend.

      Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk

    Quick Reply Quick Reply

     



    Not a Member of the Labrador Retriever Chat Forums Yet?
    Register for Free and Share Your Labrador Retriever Photos

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •