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  • Results 1 to 10 of 10
    1. #1
      Puppy
      Paul0130's Avatar
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      Puppy freaking out in crate

      Hello all. We just got our 10 week old puppy Wednesday night (3 days ago). Each night we have been walling off an area so puppy can sleep right next to us, but he really doesn't like being in his crate alone. We feed him in his crate, and keep his toys in there, but if we close that door he whimpers and barks, jumps around and kinda goes nuts. Not sure if this has anything to do with it, but he was the last one picked from his litter. I think most of his litter went at 8 weeks, so he was alone for a couple of weeks. He is a very sweet little guy, but also very spunky. He has no fear playing with our 4 year old lab, and is very confident with steps and obstacles. Right now he is at my feet and just kinda likes being close to us. Any suggestions on keeping him in the crate without him going nuts? Thanks.

    2. #2
      Senior Dog
      kimbersmom's Avatar
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      Like a little kid, he doesn’t want to be alone. You don’t give in, you just have to keep doing what you’re doing. Start small, build up the time, and don’t open the crate door until he’s quiet, even if it’s just for 2 seconds. Here’s a good guide: Crate Training 101 : The Humane Society of the United States
      Miss Kimber, CGC, 6/15/2005-1/26/18

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    3. #3
      Puppy
      Paul0130's Avatar
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      Well, after a few days of following the Humane Society guidance on crate training, little man is going into his crate a lot now. He'll even take a toy in there if he wants to keep it from his big brother (our 4 year old lab) which shows me he now thinks of it as his safe haven. HOWEVER, if I close the door and hang out with him and give him treats he's fine. The second I walk away he starts to freak. I think what we're dealing with here is a case of separation anxiety. Since he was the last of his litter to go, we think he was alone for about a week to a week and a half, and that could contribute to the SA.

      We took him to the vet today for his shots (clean bill of health), and they recommended letting him cry it out in the crate. Eventually he will stop. This breaks my heart, and I would really rather not. Any suggestion on this? Or is the vets advice the way to go?

    4. #4
      Senior Dog
      smartrock's Avatar
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      That's the usual advice, don't let him out until he's been quiet for a brief period of time, even 15 seconds will help him get the idea that being quiet is good and gets him good things. If he gets out while he's screaming his little heart out (yes, that's what it feels like, doesn't it?) he'll soon figure out that crying and complaining gets him what he wants. It's very tough.

      My older boy, who isn't with us any more, was left as the sole remaining pup of a littler of 9 for a little over a week until we could pick him up. He did not seem to have separation anxiety and we didn't have to make him cry it out because he didn't cry like that. It may not have anything to do with him being the last picked up, wasn't his mama there? I put my pup's crates in the bedroom with us, on my side of the bed. The door is closed but I'm right there to shush them or let them sniff my fingers and they usually sleep through the night pretty quickly. I'd practice putting him (your pup) in with the door shut for brief periods during the day also, to get him accustomed to being closed in. Many folks say the crying extinguishes itself pretty quickly but you have to be tough.

    5. #5
      Senior Dog
      Tanya's Avatar
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      if it is true SA forcing them to just get over it may not help at all and cause bigger issues.

      Here is a book I highly recommend. I also have some links to tricks to teach a dog that being alone is good (VS crying it out). Will try to find and share.
      https://www.amazon.ca/Ill-Be-Home-So.../dp/1891767054

      When you crate and leave if you do keep this, start with closing door with food or high valu stuffed kong. leave while they eat and come back as they finish. This associates your deperature with good things and when it's done you are back. IF THIS WORKS, you can slowly delay your return to when they finish. 30 seconds after they fnish...

      ETA:
      here is one to help teach a dog to be alone
      Separation Anxiety Behavior Modification Training - YouTube

      Another
      How to train your dog to be left alone- clicker training - YouTube

    6. #6
      Best Friend Retriever
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      Gigi was with her brother and sister till we picked up first. when we crated she was possesed she howled and screamed. In the end I kept the crate next to my bed and would sleep with my fingers in. She got good enough to sleep in the crate during night time and when we leave her. Even that stopped at 5 months once she was potty trained.

      I once put her the crate in the basement ...I know.but I just needed a 4 hr sleep after 10 days of non sleeping... She was ready to bust through the wall. She just hates rhe crate location. If it's in our or kids bedroom she was fine....



      Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk

    7. #7
      Senior Dog
      kimbersmom's Avatar
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      It *could* be separation anxiety, or it could just be "I'm going to bark until you let me out." We did the cry-it-out approach and it took 7 grueling days of ignoring her, but on the 7th day, the metaphorical clouds parted and Kimber finally accepted barking does not equal freedom.

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      Black Labbies (01-24-2018)

    9. #8
      Senior Dog
      Labradorks's Avatar
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      There is a big difference between a temper tantrum and separation anxiety. If it's true separation anxiety, letting them cry it out is a problem. If it is a temper tantrum, I typically just ignore it. I leave the puppy in there when I need to and let him out when I need to. I put bully sticks, kongs, etc. in there and eventually the puppy learns to self-soothe and be alone. If you do the thing where you wait until they are quiet to let them out, they just get quiet when you are close and start up again when you walk away. They aren't stupid! If it's a temper tantrum and you've been letting the puppy out and fussing over him, or even if he thinks it works, you might experience an extinction burst where it gets worse or as bad as it's going to get -- one last try -- before it stops. You could also try covering the crate. Separation anxiety is typically genetic and not the result of being the last puppy. Unless they took him and caged him alone without human or dog interaction during this time, I don't see it as being an issue. If the breeder did not get him acclimated to crating, you do have to work with him. While dogs do learn to like the crate, it's not really natural to be locked in a cage away from everyone. I would guess that in the wild if a dog used a cave, he'd be with his pack, curled up and touching each other.

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      Annette47 (01-25-2018)

    11. #9
      House Broken
      Black Labbies's Avatar
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      I agree with kimbersmom, separation anxiety from mom and litter-mates.

      We've had pups in the past scream bloody murder when locked in their crates. We put in an old-fashioned ticking alarm clock and covered the crate with a dark blanket and wha-la, off to sleep it was.

      Good luck with your puppy!

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      Tanya (01-25-2018)

    13. #10
      Senior Dog
      SunDance's Avatar
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      I don't let them cry "forever".

      You can preempt the problem. Put the pup in the crate and leave the room. Stay close enough so that you can hear the slightest whimper (but he can't see you). When you do, say "no" in an assertive voice (but don't yell). Do that for a while and soon your pup will stop. That's worked every time for me. You'll probably have to do this several times before he gets the idea but you should be OK within a day or two (i.e., no whimpering at all).
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