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    1. #1
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      Do's and Don'ts for new lab puppies

      New to the website so I am asking in puppy training the following.... We just brought home our new 9 week old chocolate lab puppy today. She is beautiful She will be inside/outside member of family to grow up with our kids and will transition to outside with inside privileges as she get older. Please share any do's and don'ts when it comes to getting new home routines established for best acclimation? Already taking out about every 1 to 2 hours to "potty" and have crate for us away time and night time. Chime in please.

    2. #2
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      Do keep your new family member inside. Labs are very family oriented dogs and do not thrive living outside away from the family. Just my two cents.

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    4. #3
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      do keep your lab as an indoor family member.


      do no transition your lab to being an outdoor dog with only limited "privileged" moments indoors.

      labs were bred to be our hunting partners. to be with their owners. they do not do well as outside dogs all alone 20-22 hours a day (of you work away from the home even four hours outside with your dog takes work, which means they are alone 20 hours a day.) bored dogs alone that long find all kinda of ways to keep busy including digging, destruction and barking. they are also much harder to train as they have such limited time with people and that time is often to play so they jump and get exited.

    5. #4
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      1. Do keep your puppy an inside dog. Inside privelidges will result in a bored, understimulated dog that will find her own things to do such as escapde the yard, dig, bark, fence fight, fence run, destroy grass, eat weird things, eat poop, and on and one and on. And, when you let him inside, the excitement will be too much to bear so youi'll just end up throwing the dog back out because you don't want to deal with it.

      2. Puppies need to go outside every 10 - 20 minutes when awake, as well as after playing, after waking, and after eating. Every 1- 2 hours is not enough unless sleeping and/or crated.

      3. Do not let your puppy do anything right now that you would not want a 75 - 100 lb dog doing to you or your guests or strangers on the street.

      4. At 10 weeks enroll the puppy in a class such as a Puppy STAR class for learning and socialization. After that, take a beginner obedience class. Be prepared to take another beginner class when your pup reaches adolescence, when he reverts back to a very large puppy.

      5. If you or another ADULT cannot watch the puppy, crate him. Limit the puppy's freedom until he can be trusted with pottying as well as with eating things that should not be eaten. Many puppies have ingested children's socks and had to have surgery.

      6. Socialize, socialize, socialize. Do not wait until the puppy is older or out of control before you do something. Be careful with who you socialize the puppy with as far as vaccinations go, and try to make all social engagements positive, which means only allowing the puppy to play with known, friendly dogs, one on one in a secure area.

      7. Don't change the puppy's food until he's at least six months old unless you are having serious problems.

      8. Lab puppies and kids don't always mix well. Keep kids off the floor when playing with the puppy and try to limit any screaming and running which just stimulates the puppy into "attack" mode.

      9. There will be good days and bad days. When your puppy turns three, it'll all have been worth it.

      10. It's worth mentioning again: obedience school. Do not wait until your pup is already out of control!

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    7. #5
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      Totally appreciate do's and don'ts so far. Keep em coming. Very helpful insights. I assure you, I did not mean she will be left outside to become outside dog. She will be where we are unless we are at work in which case she will join us as soon as we get home. Have crate ready for inside.

      I know to keep her limited to inside until she sees and accepts/trusts us as her family and to be patient as she learns the "potty" routine.
      Last edited by vanousb; 07-19-2014 at 06:21 PM.

    8. #6
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      Quote Originally Posted by Labradorks View Post
      8. Lab puppies and kids don't always mix well. Keep kids off the floor when playing with the puppy and try to limit any screaming and running which just stimulates the puppy into "attack" mode.

      9. There will be good days and bad days. When your puppy turns three, it'll all have been worth it.
      You didn't mention how old your kids are right now, but lab puppies can be rowdy, mouthy, nippy, and all that when they play. It can be a little intimidating for young kids. It gets better with training, and especially once they get their adult teeth and those little fangs aren't as sharp, but don't be surprised when the shark attacks happen, because they will. I can't tell you the number of people who have come on asking for help, fearful that they've gotten an "aggressive" lab puppy when they've just gotten a typical lab puppy.

      If the kids can attend or participate in obedience classes, let them. One member, who I haven't seen back since the board went down a few months ago, had a cute little girl- 1-2 years old, who had their labs wrapped around her little fingers. BUT these were older labs who were no longer puppies. You'll have to train both the puppy and your kids to coexist happily for the next few months. Don't be surprised if you have a few tears.

      When I got our first lab, I was also told that if I could make it through the first 2 years, I'd have a great dog on my hands. Sometimes it happens sooner, sometimes later, but with patience and love and training, it'll happen for you, too.
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    10. #7
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      puppy classes are terrific for the entire family, definitely start looking for one (they are usually for pups after their first shot around 8-10 weeks old)

      If you have a really solid kennel that is dig proof, provides shade and is climb proof you can try to give the pup more time outdoors unattended, but note that MANY dogs tend to bark and dig and get into trouble when left outside alone for long period of time. So consider that a possible plan but realize the pup may be happier indoors in their crate (or when they earn the freedom, inside uncrated).

      And yes lab puppies can be hellions. be patient.
      Last edited by Tanya; 07-19-2014 at 06:35 PM.

    11. #8
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      I am not sure how else to read/comprehend "outside dog with limited inside privliges". That usually means the dog lives outside and we bring it in when convenient. *sigh*

      I sure hope that is not the case. If so your best bet would be to rehome this puppy ASAP for it's best interests. Labs love thier family, I can't even take a shower alone! That includes 2 black heads that are wet by the time I am done, daily! It is not fair to give them less.
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    12. #9
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      Quote Originally Posted by Maxx&Emma View Post
      I am not sure how else to read/comprehend "outside dog with limited inside privliges". That usually means the dog lives outside and we bring it in when convenient. *sigh*

      I sure hope that is not the case. If so your best bet would be to rehome this puppy ASAP for it's best interests. Labs love thier family, I can't even take a shower alone! That includes 2 black heads that are wet by the time I am done, daily! It is not fair to give them less.

      It is not the case. My intent was to say she will be where we are and we are outside a lot and want her with us inside or out. I agree...my choice of wording is poor in this case.

    13. #10
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      Quote Originally Posted by vanousb View Post
      It is not the case. My intent was to say she will be where we are and we are outside a lot and want her with us inside or out. I agree...my choice of wording is poor in this case.
      I am really glad to hear that and wish you many happy years with your new baby!

      I also agree, starting a puppy socialization class at 10 weeks was the best and most fun thing I did! It started us on the most wonderful journey through obedience, nosework and now tracking. I am betting.Maxx could guide me to the training barn on his own at this point, if permitted to take me there. (It is only 4 miles with one turn, out of our driveway!)

      New puppies are a lot of fun and much work but so worth it in a few years!

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