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    1. #1
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      staygold912's Avatar
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      10 Month Old Jumping and Biting Wife when on leash

      Our 10 month old male constantly jumps up and bites at my wife when she walks him in the yard to go to bathroom. It's usually because he doesn't want to go inside or wants to play. He has been through 4 levels of obedience training and does NOT do this with me at all. Our trainers have said to tie him to a tree for 60 seconds at a time as a time-out when he does this, but there are no trees in the yard when she's taking him to bathroom. The only thing that has gotten him to stop jumping and biting at her is if she lets him bite the leash, he will hold that in his mouth and tug and then she's able to wrangle him back inside. He thinks corrections are PLAY, a firm EH-EH or NO, just excites him more to play and jump and bite with her. And we do use NILF as well.

      She's getting very frustrated because he only does this behavior with her. We also have a "gentle leader" and we are going to try to use that to see if it stops it. He doesn't do this in the house, and its not from an aggressive place, but an excited play one, but he's still biting her arms and legs. Looking for any other suggestions or solutions that may have worked for others.

    2. #2
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      I would stop and do a timeout in place with my back to the dog. when the pup relaxes, then continue. also could put your foot on the leash and teach the down/stay position while you wait. reward for the behavior you want.
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    3. #3
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      In my opinion, time outs are useless for a dog. They don't have the sense of consequence that a human would have. How would your dog correlate being tied to a tree with jumping? It doesn't compute in his brain.

      Who took your dog to obedience classes? What happens, is if only one does, the other person doesn't learn the same things. Plus, the wife is probably a bit less firm, has a higher pitched voice (signalling playtime), and possibly less confidence and more tentativeness in handling your dog.

      There are other things you can do in the meantime, like giving him a toy or something to carry, since he's happiest with a leash in his mouth. My current dog must take Mr. Bone out with her to potty.

      Just note, this often happens, and it's not limited to gender. I have the firmer voice (I had two wild boys, I was called "the drill sergeant" by some lol) than my current husband. The dogs will listen to me, and ignore him. Plus, he won't use the same commands that I do.

      My best advice is to have the wife take the dog through an obedience course. And failing that, she'll have to learn to be firm (not angry or mean or yell), project confidence (yes, dogs do feel through the leash), and deepen the voice a bit.

      Also, I'd question the choice of a trainer, if the only solution he/she can come up with is to tie the dog to a tree.
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      “It came to me that every time I lose a dog they take a piece of my heart with them. And every new dog who comes into my life gifts me with a piece of their heart. If I live long enough, all the components of my heart will be dog, and I will become as generous and loving as they are.”

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    5. #4
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      Whole-heartedly agree with Sue.

    6. #5
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      Quote Originally Posted by Sue View Post
      Also, I'd question the choice of a trainer, if the only solution he/she can come up with is to tie the dog to a tree.
      This makes no sense what so ever.

      I'm all for positive training, however there are times when a stern correct is needed. I use prong collars with both dogs. I don't use them 100% of the time. Last night we had my son and his family over for dinner, which included three kids, a 6 year old, and two 3 year olds. After the initial excitement of people coming to the house, Bruce was still jumping and acting like a moron. I put his prong collar and leash on, after a couple firm leash checks he got the message, and settled down. I left it on him for another 15-20 minutes. He continued to be good, so I took it off, and he was good the rest of the evening.

      I could have fed him a bunch of treats to keep his attention, and maybe it would have worked eventually. A couple firm leash checks fixed the problem pretty quick. It's not mean, inhumane or painful in any way to the dog when done correctly. Your dog basically see's your wife as an equal. While I do not believe in the whole dominance or pack leader thing, you do have to gain your dogs trust and respect. If your wife will not take control of the dog, the dog will take control of her.

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    8. #6
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      How does that make no sense, Barry?

      Do YOU consider tying a dog to a tree an effective correction? I think not.

      If you notice,the theme throughout my post is the wife has to be firmer, more confident, and less tentative. I am not going to say use a prong in my post, as that needs to be trained by a competent trainer. Not someone who says, "tie the dog to a tree for 60 seconds for a time out." Not effective.

      So yes, I stand by what I said. If the trainer can only come up with that as a solution, I'd be looking for a different trainer, one that knows the subtleties of effective correction. And yes, although mostly I use positive methods, a well timed correction to a headstrong dog gets the point across. A lot more than tying a dog to a tree. Case in point was my neighbor's Lab. A ten month old, headstrong dog who would NOT listen to the wife. She has a high pitched voice, she didn't have control of him at all. I showed her how to do a correction. He is now as well behaved for her as he is for her husband. Describing a correction in words is much harder than actually showing someone how to do it.

    9. #7
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      When I read Barry's post about "This doesn't make sense to me", I thought he was agreeing with Sue that tying the dog to the tree as a time out doesn't make sense. I hope he logs on to clarify.

      Sue said "Plus, the wife is probably a bit less firm, has a higher pitched voice (signalling playtime), and possibly less confidence and more tentativeness in handling your dog.".

      This is so totally me!
      I have a soft voice and probably soft posture, too. When I correct Mocha and he's not listening, I go into what I call "Alpha Mom Mode". I stand up straight, square my shoulders, lower my voice pitch and look Mocha straight in the eye. I'm the human, you must listen to me. This won't solve the whole problem, but it's important to be aware of the non-verbal signals you're sending, too. Even if I say "no" in a firm voice, if I'm smiling or laughing, it negates the "no".

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    11. #8
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      Thanks for all the replies. My wife is the one who took him through all his basic obedience classes for this reason. I am there but on the sidelines watching. The "tie to a tree" method the trainer suggested, is again for 60 seconds MAX, to separate the dog from you. I guess their theory is separating you and the play teaches the dog when he acts that way he gets no attention. Regardless, we can't use that method at all since there are no trees (and I've never used it anyway). Will try a toy in mouth, as well as putting the leash on the ground under foot if that doesn't work. I'll be sure to update with any progress. Thanks for all the suggestions, as he gets bigger this is more of a problem for her for sure.

    12. #9
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      Also, perhaps he needs more exercise?

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    14. #10
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      Quote Originally Posted by Sue View Post
      How does that make no sense, Barry?

      Do YOU consider tying a dog to a tree an effective correction? I think not.

      If you notice,the theme throughout my post is the wife has to be firmer, more confident, and less tentative. I am not going to say use a prong in my post, as that needs to be trained by a competent trainer. Not someone who says, "tie the dog to a tree for 60 seconds for a time out." Not effective.

      So yes, I stand by what I said. If the trainer can only come up with that as a solution, I'd be looking for a different trainer, one that knows the subtleties of effective correction. And yes, although mostly I use positive methods, a well timed correction to a headstrong dog gets the point across. A lot more than tying a dog to a tree. Case in point was my neighbor's Lab. A ten month old, headstrong dog who would NOT listen to the wife. She has a high pitched voice, she didn't have control of him at all. I showed her how to do a correction. He is now as well behaved for her as he is for her husband. Describing a correction in words is much harder than actually showing someone how to do it.
      I read this as barry agreed with you...

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