• Amused
  • Angry
  • Annoyed
  • Awesome
  • Bemused
  • Cool
  • Crazy
  • Crying
  • Drunk
  • Geeky
  • Grumpy
  • Happy
  • Hungry
  • Innocent
  • Sad
  • Secret
  • Shy
  • Tired
  • Results 1 to 6 of 6
    1. #1
      Senior Dog
      Amused
       
      beth101509's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 2014
      Location
      Southeast USA
      Posts
      701
      Thanked: 280

      Teenager "Quirkiness"?

      I was reading a different thread when someone mentioned 9 month old "quirkiness" which automatically made me think of Oliver the last couple of days. He has begun acting neurotic and was wondering what kinds of things can a person expect during the "teenage" phase?

      For example, Oliver has a toy "box" (it's more like a decorative oversized bag but you get the point) and all I usually say is "go get a toy" and he goes and gets a toy and we play with it. Well a couple of days ago, I did this and he went to his "box" put his head in it and then came back empty-handed and frantic. He did this a few more times. It was like we had never done this before.

      Or today, we went on our daily morning walk and this morning he acted like he had never been on a walk before. He was crazily sniffing at things and pulling and just would not calm down. He kept nudging into me and was panting like a madman and it was all of 45 degrees out this morning.

      Very odd. So, what things can a person expect for a dog going through the "teenage" phase and how do you know when it's over?
      “Don't allow your happiness to be interrupted by overly judgmental people. The problem is not you, because even if you do good all the time, they would still find a way to judge you wrongly.”
      Hidden Content

      Hidden Content



      Hidden Content

    2. #2
      House Broken
      K10's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 2015
      Location
      Somewhere
      Posts
      101
      Thanked: 38
      Maybe I'm lucky, but between my own dog, and foster dogs, I've never had a problem with the "teenage phase." I think people say that it's from around 9-18 months? Maybe it's because I end up starting with dogs when they're already IN that phase that I just don't notice? No past to compare with, and whatever quirkiness they come to me with becomes the baseline to me? Anyway, if I truly ever have dealt with it, I guess I can say that I just train through it like it doesn't exist, because I really honestly don't ever notice.

      I am curious to see other replies though. I might be teenage phase blind. I have known people to say their dogs are going though this phase, but don't notice anything too crazy about their dogs either. Certainly nothing crazier than the puppyhood phases that I've caught glimpses of. That, to me, seems to be the quirkiest stage.

    3. The Following User Says Thank You to K10 For This Useful Post:

      beth101509 (05-23-2015)

    4. #3
      Senior Dog
      MightyThor's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      Bend, Oregon
      Posts
      1,340
      Thanked: 1821
      Thor's teenager-ness comes through in the form of sudden-onset deafness. Commands he had been 100% solid on would just be ignored, in a "you can't tell me what to do" teenager way. We just patiently train through it. He's 16 months old and it's getting better. And it is almost always with the more casual commands. He still responds strongly to a solid "COME" but the more casual "come here!" gets ignored. It's kind of funny - I'll use the "come here!" when I'm going inside or walking into a different part of the house. He'll give me that defiant "I'm not going to listen to you" look so I'll just walk away. And about 2 seconds later he'll come rushing back to my side, all "hey you weren't supposed to leave without me!" worried face.

    5. The Following User Says Thank You to MightyThor For This Useful Post:

      beth101509 (05-23-2015)

    6. #4
      Senior Dog
      Maxx&Emma's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      SE, PA
      Posts
      4,407
      Thanked: 1994
      Yes, they can appear to have selective hearing at that age, some worse than others. Maxx was not too bad but I have had others that were exasperating!
      Hidden Content

      Tammy
      Maxx and Emma Jean

      Ozzy - 10/2002 - 06/2011 - Rest well my sweet boy. You are forever remembered, forever missed, forever in my heart.

    7. The Following User Says Thank You to Maxx&Emma For This Useful Post:

      beth101509 (05-23-2015)

    8. #5
      Senior Dog
      Labradorks's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2014
      Location
      USA
      Posts
      3,368
      Thanked: 1900
      Possibly. Just train through it and he'll come out the other end just fine. Just time and patience. I probably would not suddenly decide to start teaching him a new sport until he's past the phase. Remember that they cannot help it; it's the hormones.

    9. The Following User Says Thank You to Labradorks For This Useful Post:

      beth101509 (05-23-2015)

    10. #6
      Best Friend Retriever
      OHfemail's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2014
      Location
      NE Ohio
      Posts
      480
      Thanked: 251
      Gabby was such an easy puppy - listened, learned and loved right from the get go. Then she hit 9 months...a couple of shoes mysteriously turned to rubber and leather pieces, and the toilet paper roll became her very favorite thing to unroll. It was like a switch turned on and she couldn't get into enough stuff that she'd had no interest in before. We just kept shaking our heads and wondering who this destructive girl was. It was 2 days of looking like our house had been tp'd on the inside before we figured out the 'quirkiness' was her age. We gently corrected her, shut the bathroom doors, and put the shoes away. Problem solved in a short time frame (although she still can't resist q-tips or earplugs in the trashcans - earwax fetish - ugh).

    11. The Following User Says Thank You to OHfemail For This Useful Post:

      beth101509 (05-23-2015)

    Quick Reply Quick Reply

     



    Not a Member of the Labrador Retriever Chat Forums Yet?
    Register for Free and Share Your Labrador Retriever Photos

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •