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    1. #11
      Real Retriever
      JC001's Avatar
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      The rescue I work with has a one page application and in depth interviews are done with potential adopters regarding the specifics of the dog someone is interested in. Good rescues ask lots of questions, do home visits, make sure the entire family is onboard and ensure that all dogs in the household are compatible. It may feel like a hassle to potential adopters but they want to do right for both the dog and adoptive family and avoid a bad fit.

      Not all adopters do their research and need to be told that a dog won't be a good fit for their family or lifestyle...and sometimes a specific fence type is necessary for a specific dog. A good rescue will take that information and make suggestions about other dogs in their program or other breeds that will be a fit for a family and their lifestyle.

      Look at it as they are doing their research just like you are.

    2. The Following User Says Thank You to JC001 For This Useful Post:

      voodoo (01-06-2017)

    3. #12
      Senior Dog
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      I'd applied with a rescue prior to finding Sunnie (that dog was taken by the time my application was finalized and Sunnie was recommended by the coordinator of that rescue...she was in an out-of-State shelter and I never would have found her myself). I don't remember the length of the application but I had to give three references and the name of my vet (they checked with all four sources) and then I had a home visit. I was just glad that they thought enough of their dogs to thoroughly vet the folks interested in taking them.
      Hidden Content

      Sunnie: gotcha day 03/08/09; birth unknown but given 07/01/02

      Danny: The Sundance Kid....Sunnie's boy....birth 03/31/09 (in my living room)

      Barb (ID formerly "Baffle")

    4. #13
      Senior Dog
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      Im ok with the process, i filled it out and sent it in. Im just thinking in the back of my mind how I have raised an awesome chili doggie and now I get to be interviewed and have my vet/friends/family questioned along with my home scrutinized when I am trying to help. Its not about the money(for a new dog or for an adoption)...since this is my 1st time, Im just going with the flow...but even my non pet owner family is like wtf when it comes to adoption. I dont even know if I will like the dog after I meet it or my dog will like it after I have spent a good day or so of effort. I have a great loving home looking for another family member...hope it all works out. Its not a problem to buy another 2k puppy, but it shouldnt be a problem to adopt 1 either.
      First time pet owner
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      Chili born 7/21/2013

    5. #14
      Senior Dog
      Shelley's Avatar
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      Best of luck to you, I am sorry they are giving you a hard time. Just so you know, I do just about the same thing, my questionnaire is only two pages though. ;-)

    6. #15
      Senior Dog
      Tanya's Avatar
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      a good rescue isn't grilling your family and vet. Nor are they "scrutinizing your home".

      They want to see that you brought your dog to the vet at least semi regularly and generally more or less listened to strong recommendations (if not we would ask why and there may be valid reasons). How else are they supposed to know you actually bring your dog to a vet? We've had applicants with 10 year old dogs that hadn't been to a vet in 7 years. In some cases we did adopt to them after further discussion (so it's not black or white either).

      I actually don'T particularly like personal references but they can be handy to get an idea of your experience with dogs in general. believe it or not we've had some sorta say this wasn't a good time for that person to get a dog :P

      The home visit really for me is about the family meeting the dog (in most cases) and seeing the dog in their environment. We look for things that could be a danger or an issue not fr cleanliness or size of home. Ex: someone who thinks their house is fully secured but there is a huge gap - not saying we won't adopt but we'll point it out). As well as seeing how the dog and any resident animal get along. Sometimes we'll do that on neutral territory if needed (based on dogs). Remember most people want dogs to get along quite well and are not really willing to trouble shoot blending issues.

      Yes some visits are ridiculous. But remember a GOOD rescue isn't there to JUDGE ANYONE. Especially with all breed rescues and stuff. It's about finding the right dog for that family. We've had MANYYYY people apply on a dog that is totally not a fit for their home/schedule/lifestyle. No we are NOT gonna adopt that particular dog to them. But if they are willing to let us recommend a better fit we do. And we've made great matches that way. It's rarely rarely rarely about "being a good dog owner or not" but about finding the family a dog that is the best fit for them, and a family that is a good fit for the dog to increase odds it's a forever home.

      I've adopted out to first time dog owners, family with young kids, lots of no yards, no fenced yard, living in apartments. all depending on keen-ness of adopter and the dog in question.

    7. The Following User Says Thank You to Tanya For This Useful Post:

      voodoo (01-06-2017)

    8. #16
      Real Retriever
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      Think through .

      To save on the lab rescue questionnaire and get a actual dog after repeated rejections.
      Cost here in New England to adopt is close to 800 for a lab.
      Turned down due to no fence .
      Turned down due to small kids.

      We adopted a chocolate lab on Facebook for 100 and the dog arrived neutered and in great condition.
      The rescue had a no return policy but said he was kid friendly .
      He was not, found out that the foster when took the dog out for walks ,the dog on walks he did not bark at kids .So they classified him as kid friendly.

      We absolutely loved him but with a 4 yr old we could not risk a incident..He was not exposed to kids and there antics . But I absolutely cried like a baby when. I dropped him off.

      Also when they said medium dog ,out comes a skinny 80 lbs really tall chocolate lab hound mix. We were able to rehome him with a good local rescue.again he was a amazing dog .

      We have Gigi we got for 400 ,half the price of the local rescue cost from a backyard breeder. Wish adoptions are a little cheaper especially labs.

      We learned a lot about breeds ,breeders ,adoption and just having a big dog. We made a few mistakes and it's experience .

      We are actually going to foster a dog a d next year I am building a fenced area.

      Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk
      Last edited by silverfz; 01-06-2017 at 10:24 PM.

    9. #17
      Senior Dog
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      voodoo's Avatar
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      i am pro positive for adoptive/rehoming....just a tad sensitive. maybe its my memories of walking down the execution line at the spca back in the 70's....

      I hope I can adopt this big 3 yr old choc lab in area. just wished it wasnt so detailed. if anything i should be asking more questions for its health insurance policy.

    10. #18
      Senior Dog
      SunDance's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by voodoo View Post
      Im ok with the process, i filled it out and sent it in. Im just thinking in the back of my mind how I have raised an awesome chili doggie and now I get to be interviewed and have my vet/friends/family questioned along with my home scrutinized when I am trying to help. Its not about the money(for a new dog or for an adoption)...since this is my 1st time, Im just going with the flow...but even my non pet owner family is like wtf when it comes to adoption. I dont even know if I will like the dog after I meet it or my dog will like it after I have spent a good day or so of effort. I have a great loving home looking for another family member...hope it all works out. Its not a problem to buy another 2k puppy, but it shouldnt be a problem to adopt 1 either.
      The actual meeting with this particular dog may not go well....but you'll have been approved to adopt A dog and won't have to go through all of that with a future pick. According to the rescue I'd used, approvals from other rescues are often used by rescues, too...maybe the rescues/shelters have select lists of ones they'll consider, but you may already have a leg up with other places, too. One of the questions on the form I had to fill out was about other applications/other rescues.

      Good luck...hope all goes well with this.

    11. #19
      Real Retriever
      Java's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by voodoo View Post
      ...are all adoptions so intense?...
      I'd guess it depends on the shelter or rescue, and the availability of dogs in your area. Through the SPCA shelters here, I've adopted adult dogs twice now. I was interviewed pretty intensely for both dogs but via long, friendly conversations (email/phone, in person). To my surprise, competition for dog-friendly, people-friendly, medium/large dogs was (and still is) strong. I had to act quickly - check listings daily & email a completed application asap because the most likely candidates got snapped up before I could even drive out to see them! I think I must fit some sort of profile for the ideal adopter for older dogs because both times, the shelter decided during my first visit that I was the right person. But when I asked a volunteer at one shelter about a younger German Shepherd, she shut me down on the spot by telling me they were looking for a particular kind of person to adopt him. I was a little taken aback but took that to mean they were looking for someone with high energy levels.

      Adoption through rescue organizations seem to take longer here, more like what you describe.

      Good luck with your search!

    12. #20
      House Broken
      Pogie's Avatar
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      I got my cat from a local pound here. What I thought was odd was to adopt a dog I would have had to go through the same thing your describing.
      I wasn't looking for a dog at the time I wanted a cat. I still have her and she is a nice kitty
      But anyway I went in to look at the cats they had and I filled out a VERY short application form, picked the cat I wanted and had her in the next 2 days. Only reason being was because she had not been spayed yet. They didn't even check with my vet. Seems they are much picker with dogs adoptions compared to cats. Here anyway.

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