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    1. #11
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      Quote Originally Posted by Bernie View Post
      Bingo!
      And your point is???

      Actually, never mind ... I don’t think I want to know.
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    2. #12
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      I know this might not be a popular sentiment among breeders, but I don't think a dog like that should be sold for as much as a puppy. The breeder is usually rehoming the dog because it is no longer useful to them. The dog has had her litters and done her time in the ring and now the breeder wants to bring up a new prospect. I am not saying the breeder is a bad person for rehoming the dog. In fact, I think it is very kind and a selfless act on the part of the breeder for a dog in a breeder home to be rehomed into a household where there are fewer dogs and more attention with the opportunity to live in the house with their people 24/7 (in some cases, breeder dogs live in kennels at least part time) and maybe have a new job if the dog leaves the show business and is bored.

      As a new owner of one of these dogs, why would they care that the dog was pointed or an AKC GCH? Or that the dog's litters of puppies were awesome? They will not benefit at all from any of that if the dog is spayed, other than the health clearances. If the dog was trained for a sport (obedience, field work, agility, rally, etc.) then I can see the value going up because it's above and beyond the normal training that any four year old dog would typically have, which is a benefit to the new owner.

      If the breeder can get the money and ensure that the dog has an amazing retirement home, then more power to them! And, for some, the value of a house trained, socialized dog that probably won't change in temperament is worth a lot - you know what you are getting temperament wise and don't have to deal with the teeth and the house breaking or the crate training, etc. For someone like me, the value of a dog that can be shaped and molded into what I want is worth more money PLUS dealing with a puppy (which I really love, teeth and all!).

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    4. #13
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      Quote Originally Posted by Annette47 View Post
      And your point is???

      Actually, never mind ... I don’t think I want to know.
      My point was; why in-the-hell would the breeder expect the buyer to pay for this?
      This whole idea is an example of- "they saw you coming."

    5. #14
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      Sounds expensive.i seen 3_5k$ for a young companion Labradors for sale. These are fully trained labs at 1 yr.

      At 4 you do not know how many quality years you will get for the money .

      Sounds expensive when one get a full training. 1 yr olds for a little more or same if you include the medical stuff.

      Also so many labs are at rescues who will jump for a 4 yr old plus for adoptions.plus most will come complete vetted ,trained and a foster who will have alot of info.

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      Last edited by silverfz; 01-22-2017 at 07:19 PM.

    6. #15
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      Quote Originally Posted by silverfz View Post
      Sounds expensive.i seen 3_5k$ for a young companion Labradors for sale. These are fully trained labs at 1 yr.

      At 4 you do not know how many quality years you will get for the money .

      Sounds expensive when one get a full training. 1 yr olds for a little more or same if you include the medical stuff.

      Also so many labs are at rescues who will jump for a 4 yr old plus for adoptions.plus most will come complete vetted ,trained and a foster who will have alot of info.

      Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk
      Four is still quite young for a Lab. It's true that rescues are a lot less expensive, but by four many have been bounced around from home to home, have lived in a backyard for four years, are from low quality breeders who produce dogs without health clearances and with questionable temperaments. Sometimes you get lucky and there is a really nice dog that lived with a responsible family who had some sort of an emergency, but those are few and far between. Most people who give up a dog are simply irresponsible. There are many diamonds in the rough in rescue and with some work plus luck, you can get yourself a really nice dog.

    7. #16
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      Actually, I'd argue about a lab being "fully trained" at 1 yo. Haven't seen one yet that was fully trained, even on a pro's truck. But you are correct, it's not unusual to see that price for a "started" dog.

      As for pricing on a "retired" bitch/ dog, this is a 4yo. I consider 4 to be a fantastic age because what you see is what you get temperament, soundness, etc wise! For $2000 the new owner will have a dog that will likely be w/ them at least 8 more yrs. That's $250/ yr. Add in the spay, that's still nothing.

      I hear of Rescues charging as much as $800, so why would a breeder NOT charge significantly more for the value added? Sure they could just give the dog to a friend too. I have done that as well, but my girl was already 7.5 yrs old (she lived another 5 yrs) and was very well trained. These folks may be operating as a business too, and just trying to cover their expenses. I don't see $2000 to be outrageous at all, especially when you look at the average cost of puppy shots/ vet visits that first year.

      Quote Originally Posted by silverfz View Post
      Sounds expensive.i seen 3_5k$ for a young companion Labradors for sale. These are fully trained labs at 1 yr.

      At 4 you do not know how many quality years you will get for the money .

      Sounds expensive when one get a full training. 1 yr olds for a little more or same if you include the medical stuff.

      Also so many labs are at rescues who will jump for a 4 yr old plus for adoptions.plus most will come complete vetted ,trained and a foster who will have alot of info.

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    8. #17
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      Quote Originally Posted by windycanyon View Post
      Actually, I'd argue about a lab being "fully trained" at 1 yo. Haven't seen one yet that was fully trained, even on a pro's truck. But you are correct, it's not unusual to see that price for a "started" dog.

      As for pricing on a "retired" bitch/ dog, this is a 4yo. I consider 4 to be a fantastic age because what you see is what you get temperament, soundness, etc wise! For $2000 the new owner will have a dog that will likely be w/ them at least 8 more yrs. That's $250/ yr. Add in the spay, that's still nothing.

      I hear of Rescues charging as much as $800, so why would a breeder NOT charge significantly more for the value added? Sure they could just give the dog to a friend too. I have done that as well, but my girl was already 7.5 yrs old (she lived another 5 yrs) and was very well trained. These folks may be operating as a business too, and just trying to cover their expenses. I don't see $2000 to be outrageous at all, especially when you look at the average cost of puppy shots/ vet visits that first year.
      I agree to u and labradocksI​ .I am just putting some thoughts I would have if I do not know the breeder .
      Also I am surprised a show dog will never be trained . Is that common?.

      The people I know who has x breeding dogs usually were cheaper and spayed by the breeder.



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      Last edited by silverfz; 01-23-2017 at 03:18 PM.

    9. #18
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      Quote Originally Posted by Bernie View Post
      My point was; why in-the-hell would the breeder expect the buyer to pay for this?
      This whole idea is an example of- "they saw you coming."
      Because that's how it's done. But like I mentioned, most of the other breeders I know who rehome older dogs, don't bother with rehoming fees, just recoup the cost of altering the animal. And typically that's done because full registration can't be revoked, and if an intact dog is sold to an idiot, then they could be having more puppies. But having the dog altered before it leaves the home, that fixes that.
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    10. #19
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      Just my opinion, but that seems kinda high for an older dog.

      I would think the breeder would have the dog altered BEFORE placing it in another home. It would be in the breeders best interest I would think..I am not a breeder so maybe I'm wrong. But in my line of thinking seems they would want to make sure she wasn't bred after placing her, there for they should have it done before the fact.

      I wouldn't buy this dog, but again this is just my opinion

    11. #20
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      Quote Originally Posted by Pogie View Post
      Just my opinion, but that seems kinda high for an older dog.

      I would think the breeder would have the dog altered BEFORE placing it in another home. It would be in the breeders best interest I would think..I am not a breeder so maybe I'm wrong. But in my line of thinking seems they would want to make sure she wasn't bred after placing her, there for they should have it done before the fact.

      I wouldn't buy this dog, but again this is just my opinion
      They do have the dog spayed before it goes to the new home. But they want to be reimbursed for the fee. And usually they don't alter the dog until it's placed.

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