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    Thread: 2nd dog

    1. #1
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      2nd dog

      We are thinking of adding to our family. A friend of a friend has 2 great dane puppies and she due to a family change wants them gone.

      I have never had 2 dogs and am a bit freaked. The puppy is 8 weeks old now and she has the parents . Just does not want the puppies which she planned to keep .

      How much of a change I am looking at . I am sure rhe dane is alot less demanding gigi in walks and stuff.

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      Last edited by silverfz; 01-24-2018 at 11:32 AM.

    2. #2
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      I've never had a Dane so I can't address that.

      But, please, do not get another dog unless YOU want another dog and have familiarized yourself thoroughly with the breed.
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    4. #3
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      Dane pups can be a handlful. they are HUGE teenagers so while maybe not "as bad" as a lab, their size is a factor.

      They can also have health issues especially if this was a random litter and no health clearances were done. So just be aware of potential major expenses. Hip issues, bloat..autoimmune issues...

      A larger dog is just more expensive for everything. All meds and care is more. I noticed a big difference just between Penny and Rocky (40pounds VS 80 pounds) Managing a larger dog who is injured or old is more work (you can't carry them).

      Gigi may have improved with time and age but adding a young dog will create a very high distractions/higher energy in the home so things will be pretty hectic for awhile (she is still pretty young right?). Gigi will need a refresher on commands with the added distraction on top of training the new puppy. Play may need to be interrupted. Many members have posted about their older dog not liking the new puppy for many days, weeks or even months.

      At first it will be a lot more work. Gigi still needing more exercise, puppy require more training and one on one bonding time. Once the puppy is older and trained and you get a routine things settle into something much easier (not a ton harder than one dog - but twice as expensive!)

      A ton will also depend on the temperment of the puppy.What are the parents like? friendly? easy going? or hyper? grandparents? what about the individual puppies, what are their temperment?

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    6. #4
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      My wife has wanted a dane all her life. We have a quite a few of then between her brother and our close friends.

      They are strong and my brother in law has 1yr old that is sweet but she is not leash trained and has major anxiety . I am told badly breed ones have aggression. Also that for 2 yrs very limited activity due to growth rate.

      My wife is turning 40 in a few days and at some point got to keep my promise of a dane some time in the future I made like 10 yrs ago .

      Maybe not these but I am visting some breeders ....




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    7. #5
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      Good breeder goes A VERY long way in avoiding most issues (bad temperment, reduce risk of health issues).

      On the health side, here are the minimum recommend clearances recommended for the breed Canine Health Information Center: CHIC Information

      really quiz the breeder on temperment, how they select breeding dogs. What they do with their dogs.

      Also, in our area we have a number of dane rescues so finding a great dane in rescue isn't too too bad. Not all have major issues.

    8. #6
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      Based on what you've written, I personally would never take one of these puppies. They sound like the product of a not-so-great breeder. Rushing into getting a dog of any breed often sets you up for, at minimum, not having the optimal situation for the new dog and the existing family members.

      If I were you, I'd research the breed, and speak with reputable breeders who are doing at least the minimum (and better yet, more than the bare minimum) health clearances, and who are also proving their dogs deserve to be bred by testing them in at least one venue (do they show, compete in tracking, etc., etc.).

      Training a dog with a long adolescence requires patience and real authority when your 6-month old puppy is larger than a full grown Labrador. The Danes in my dogs' obedience classes (from show breeders) have been a handful. One of them has to be attached via a braided steel cord to a weighted concrete block during portions of class, because he likes to take off suddenly from a down or sit to play with the other dogs; since his owner is a smaller woman who is unable to hold onto him when he gets these notions, he has to be leashed to the concrete block.

      Going from one to two dogs is a harder transition IMO than going from two to three or other multiples. If your current dog is still quite young (2 or less) they still need a good amount of training reinforcement and exercise. The Dane will not be ready for any real forced exercise for a long time.

      Bigger dog = bigger costs -- everything they need is bigger (kennels, etc.); vet costs are more, as they're often weight-based; buying from a reputable breeder is likely more than the average well-bred Labrador. Dealing with XL-size senior dogs requires more physical effort.

      The Great Dane Club of America is a good resource, and they can point you toward your local AKC club chapter(s) as well. If your wife loves the breed and dreams of having one, I think you owe it to her to get one from a great breeder who is striving to produce puppies that most closely reflect what a Great Dane should be in terms of temperament and physicality. Also, this sort of breeder will be a lifelong resource and support for you. In the event the dog doesn't work out for you, a reputable breeder will always take their dog back should it need to be rehomed for any reason.

      The Great Dane Club of New England has a spring 2018 specialty show (a show just for Great Danes). I think their weekend is usually the second week of May. You might reach out to the club and try to meet breeders and see their dogs and how they act. Attending a specialty show is a great way to see multiple examples of the breed from various breeders.

      Great Dane Club of America, The Offical Website for the GDCA

      GDCNE - Index

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    10. #7
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      We are not getting these as suddenly the pups are parents are now in Virginia . Initially told ny near I visit regularly for work. Then was offered shipping.

      I think having done both the buying dogs online and shipping in a crate and buying puppy without seeing parents. We dropped it like it was hot.

      But I do plan to visit a local breeder .

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    11. #8
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      Quote Originally Posted by silverfz View Post
      We are not getting these as suddenly the pups are parents are now in Virginia . Initially told ny near I visit regularly for work. Then was offered shipping.

      I think having done both the buying dogs online and shipping in a crate and buying puppy without seeing parents. We dropped it like it was hot.

      But I do plan to visit a local breeder .

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      As you prepare to visit local breeder(s), just know that many reputable breeders do NOT have both parents on premises. Generally speaking, a lot of reputable breeders of any breed will own the dam of their litter, but will often breed their girl to a dog that is offsite/owned by another breeder or exhibitor. It is very common for good breeders to look outside their own kennel to find a stud that compliments their girl, especially when they are seeking to improve upon their stock from generation to generation.

      Breeders should be interviewing you, just as much as you are interviewing them. If the puppy purchase seems solely transactional in nature, that's a yellow flag IMO.

      Things to think about as you are looking at breeders:

      - What do the breeders do with the their dogs? The best pets are going to come from a breeder who does something with their breeding stock (e.g. competes in AKC conformation shows, competes in agility, competes in tracking, etc.).
      - Do they belong to a breed club for their breed? In the case of Great Danes, do they belong to the local Great Dane club (e.g. Great Dane Club of New England) or the parent club for the breed (Great Dane Club of America)?
      - What health testing do they do with their breeding stock? What health testing does the sire have?
      - How long have they been in the breed?
      - Can they provide any information on how they raise and socialize their puppies? You don't want a 120 lb. poorly socialized dog at the end of the day. A good breeder does a lot to get their puppies ready for the outside world.

    12. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to dxboon For This Useful Post:

      IRISHWISTLER (01-25-2018), silverfz (01-24-2018), SunDance (01-26-2018), Tanya (01-25-2018)

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