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    1. #11
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      Nope, absolutely not. Never. And it's not one of those "never say never" deals for me. Even field work, no way. They are kenneled, put on chain gangs and even the nicest trainers are not going to look at my dog as an individual, a family member, but as another dog to train. Sure, they care to some extent and they are most likely nice to the dogs and doing their best. I think most people are good and mean well. But, never in a million years would I leave my dog to sleep in a cement kennel overnight alone. My dogs are my babies and they sleep in a home, with companionship, their family (and they are well-trained and obedient) and I do not intimidate, hit or use other methods to promote fear or intimidation or pain. I've never met a board and train that did not use punishment and I fear that punishment means different things to different people and worry about pressure to get the dog to a certain place in their training by a certain time, regardless of where the dog is in their own journey. I have met one trainer similar to this who takes in puppies for a few months and does the basics in her home, no kennel, and while I would not do that myself, there may be some value in this for a family with toddlers or similar (it's mostly Labs she does this with) and her background is Guide Dogs for the Blind puppy raiser (for decades) and she teaches puppy classes at a well-known trainer's facility and everyone knows her. And, let's say the trainer is great, but what about his kennel help who is handling your dogs? Are you going to vet every person to come in contact with the dog? Not only that, but you cannot monitor what is going on with the other dogs. I was recently at a facility of a very well-known trainer and two dogs broke out in a fence fight in the kennel so they were hosed. Now, is hosing mean in this situation? No; it's probably an effective way to get things to stop. But I don't want my dog exposed to that on a regular basis. A kennel situation, the barking, is extremely stressful to a dog that is not used to it.

      I cannot tell you how many times I've met someone who sent their dog away only to have it not work out or not last more than two weeks. Or the dog would only work for the trainer. Two years in a row we had dogs at our WC who just came back from the trainer and those were the only two dogs that didn't pass! They actually just...left. The four-month-old test dog who'd never seen a bird did better! Dogs are dogs, not robots. They do not go to the kennel and get programmed. I'd take the money and find a great trainer and learn how to train and maintain the dog yourself. Work hard and in a few years, you'll have a very well-trained dog and a strong bond.

      In over 20 years I've never heard of a boarding facility that will not take dogs they did not train. Don't believe everything you see on the internet. There are lots of places and facilities that doctor their reviews. Make sure that if you go through with this, you look at the name of the owner and trainers, not just the name of the kennel.
      Last edited by Labradorks; 05-29-2017 at 05:40 PM.

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    3. #12
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      I’ve boarded my dogs before - not all places have them in cement runs, and many do not let dogs that aren’t from the same family interact, so some of what Labradorks is referring to can be avoided. I agree that I’ve never heard of a place that won’t accept dogs they haven’t trained, so you may just have to keep searching if you do need to board him eventually. In some ways I prefer a good quality, reputable boarding facility to an unknown, potentially flighty pet sitter. Sure, if you have friends or family that can help, that’s ideal, but not all of us have access to that.

      That said, I much prefer training my own dogs with the help of a good Obedience class. It’s the best way of getting to know your dog, and understanding how he learned a command can help you problem-solve when he eventually has trouble with it. It really doesn’t take that much of a time investment to teach a dog basic manners. Probably 10-15 minutes most days dedicated to actual training, along with consistency and practice in day-to-day activities will do it for most dogs. (For example, teaching “sit” in an actual training session, but then practicing it for things like putting on a leash, getting dinner, etc.).
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    5. #13
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      Hmmmm... maybe Reno is a small market for dog-training and boarding. The facility I use (we have gone on trips to the UK and Ireland, for example) will take in boarders that they have not trained. But, I guess it just depends on where you are.

      I would go nuts with a dog sitter, worried that the wind could keep the front door from shutting completely and bingo, the dogs are on the street with their noses down following interesting scent. It would just be an image that would would bother the heck out of me and I'd have difficulty enjoying my vaykay.

      It's a very individual kind of thing and every dog and family situation, access to a range of facilities... all of that is so highly variable. My three are happy to go to the kennel... and thrilled to come home. They are just really flexible and go-with-the-flow kind of dogs.

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    7. #14
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      Hunting training is fine for sending away. Obedience training needs to be done by YOU.
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    9. #15
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      Funny how folks that are so anti- "board and train" have never had any, or have had very limited personal experience in doing so. The K9's I work with are hand selected by me by an assessment conducted by me in the presence of their owner(s). I decide to either accept or reject the recruit. I only train gun dog / hunt test prospects and I use a success based training model that results in highly confident and motivated retrievers that live to work and hunt. Generally, the first 6 to 8 weeks of training for dogs that I accept for training is spent entrenching progressive to formalized obedience, that being foundational to all continuing gun dog related training. I work with the client in designing an individualized program that will meet their objectives for their individual dog(s). Dogs I work with receive the highest level of care and are often taken on "field trips" off of the home training grounds to provide more stimulating experiences and to work under varying conditions of distraction in proofing their obedience. I also like to expose them to a number of differing cover types and environmental conditions to make them highly adaptive working dogs. The dogs I work with are not motivated by fear, are never hit or struck, and are monitored carefully for any condition or injury that may happen infrequently to any working dog. Dogs experiencing any such condition or injury are immediately discussed with their owner(s) and are brought to a veterinarian for proper care.

      One cannot judge every "boarding training" facility / program based on their limited or absent experience with others. I do highly concur that training any dog should include training of the owner / handler and that such training should also include instruction in maintaining the training level achieved. I also concur that any owner considering either home training programs or a board and train program do their due diligence in selection of those services.

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    11. #16
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      I did a board and train because I had to be out of the country for 3 weeks and needed to board bubba during that time anyway. It wasn't successful he came back knowing nothing more than when I left him (but none worse for wear he was still a happy and healthy pup), and I got my money back so it wasn't a negative experience for me (they oferred to take him again but at that point I was back and could train him myself and didn't have faith in them anymore). Bubba is also a very resilient dog, not soft at all so I didn't worry about the experience might impact him emotionally.

      I looked at a lot of different places, many didn't have availability since I needed very specific dates, but I agree wholeheartedly with what irishwhistler said. It's difficult because many of the really great places don't even have websites, you have to find names by scouring the internet to find recommendations or if you know people in the industry that is easier. Find a place that is picky about the dogs they take, visit them multiple times, and make sure they only take limited dogs.

      And of course, no dog will be trained in weeks, or months, or even a year! You need to keep training them everyday once you get them back.
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    13. #17
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      Quote Originally Posted by IRISHWISTLER View Post
      Funny how folks that are so anti- "board and train" have never had any, or have had very limited personal experience in doing so. The K9's I work with are hand selected by me by an assessment conducted by me in the presence of their owner(s). I decide to either accept or reject the recruit. I only train gun dog / hunt test prospects and I use a success based training model that results in highly confident and motivated retrievers that live to work and hunt. Generally, the first 6 to 8 weeks of training for dogs that I accept for training is spent entrenching progressive to formalized obedience, that being foundational to all continuing gun dog related training. I work with the client in designing an individualized program that will meet their objectives for their individual dog(s). Dogs I work with receive the highest level of care and are often taken on "field trips" off of the home training grounds to provide more stimulating experiences and to work under varying conditions of distraction in proofing their obedience. I also like to expose them to a number of differing cover types and environmental conditions to make them highly adaptive working dogs. The dogs I work with are not motivated by fear, are never hit or struck, and are monitored carefully for any condition or injury that may happen infrequently to any working dog. Dogs experiencing any such condition or injury are immediately discussed with their owner(s) and are brought to a veterinarian for proper care.

      One cannot judge every "boarding training" facility / program based on their limited or absent experience with others. I do highly concur that training any dog should include training of the owner / handler and that such training should also include instruction in maintaining the training level achieved. I also concur that any owner considering either home training programs or a board and train program do their due diligence in selection of those services.

      Irishwhistler
      Thank you so much for your response. This is just what we are looking for, obedience wise. We are looking at this as a foundation to grow off of. We are looking for trainers that we will continue to have an ongoing relationship with and help us learn how to train Chutes best ourselves going forward from this. DH isn't an avid hunter, but may eventually be interested in doing some gun dog training with Chutes as a hobby. Being that this is his first pup, this whole process is a learning experience for us. We are looking for help and guidance through the training process.

      DH had a consultation at our home today with one of the trainers we are very interested in and it went very well. They seem to be just what we are looking for. We are still waiting to hear back from another before making a decision. These trainers (two of them) only offer boarding to previous training clients because they only board limited dogs at a time and it's in their own home. They also conduct the "board and training" in their own home (NOT a cement floored, hot Texas, lonely kennel.) Each trainer only works with 1-3 dogs max at a time.

      The program we are looking at starts with a two week board and train to teach the puppy basic obedience and manners. After this, they bring Chutes back to us and give us a private lesson in our home to go over and train us on what he's learned and how to move forward with him. Then a couple months later, when he's 6 months old, he goes back to them for a three week board and train to continue with advanced obedience. Then again, after the second board and train, they bring Chutes back to us and give us another private lesson in our home where they will go over what he's learned and train us. Then after Chutes has completed both of these programs, there are four private lessons included with us, Chutes and the trainer. (ETA: Part of the training program while he's boarded with them is they also eventually take "field trips" to parks, local restaurants with patio seating, stores, etc. in order to generalize and socialize the dog in all kinds of different places, around different people and animals and situations. Not just at home training.)

      NOT just a board and train and done. We would have an ongoing relationship with the trainer for questions, issues and someplace safe we can take him for extended boarding if ever needed.

      Thank you very much for all y'all's responses, no matter what your opinion of board and train is. I asked for all opinions and experiences (or, I suppose, inexperience, as well) and I got it! It's clear how passionate everyone is about the well being of their babies and I can appreciate that VERY much! Chutes is our baby and we are just trying to be the best puppy parents we can be for him.
      Last edited by jenfarm; 05-30-2017 at 04:25 PM.
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    14. #18
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      I wouldn't want to because I like doing the work for myself and creating the bond. I think you're looking for a slightly different foundation though. If the board and train really will be the best for Chuttes, then it is the best option for you.


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    15. #19
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      I think it sounds like the OP and her significant other are kinda new to the whole puppy/dog-training thing. I can see why they are turning to an experienced hand. I would expect that if they have good success and learn a lot from their work with Chutes, they would have more confidence to work soup-to-nuts with their next dog.

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    17. #20
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      Quote Originally Posted by TuMicks View Post
      I think it sounds like the OP and her significant other are kinda new to the whole puppy/dog-training thing. I can see why they are turning to an experienced hand. I would expect that if they have good success and learn a lot from their work with Chutes, they would have more confidence to work soup-to-nuts with their next dog.
      You get me! LOL. This is where we are coming from.
      I grew up with labs but haven't had a puppy since I was... a small kid. When, of course, the sole responsibility of the dog was not mine. DH has never had a puppy. This is basically our first puppy and a learning experience for both of us. We are looking for a little bit of help and guidance.

      When the trainers came over for the consult and evaluation with Chutes, she mentioned she could tell we'd been working with him. We are trying.

      Chutes, maybe unfortunately, is a little bit of a guinea pig for us. We are learning so much with him. And like you said, yes, we are hoping that what we learn with Chutes will better prepare us for our next dog and give us the confidence to totally do it ourselves with our next pup.
      Last edited by jenfarm; 05-31-2017 at 08:37 AM.

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