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  • Results 1 to 10 of 10
    1. #1
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      Jax's Mom's Avatar
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      Training help: jumping at and barking at people or things

      Ok, jax is 1. We've done puppy training and he did well. He still does well if you have a treat. Lately he's been using his big boy bark. He does it to people at the beach as well as anyone on a bicycle. He jumps up and around and barks like crazy. With that said his tail wags happily the whole time.

      Honestly I think he wants them to acknowledge him or play. But it sometimes scares people even though he is leashed. I'd like him to just be a people watcher. He is a sweetheart and so lovely. He goes to a puppy play and is very submissive and gets along well with all (we are told by the staff).

      He still pulls when walking also. We have the harnesses (3 different kind) that are no pull but I don't think that's teaching him to not pull.

      Some folks have mentioned the collar with prongs...I don't want to hurt him, I've also Bern told about a shock collar...again, I don't want to hurt him.

      He is not a hunting dog he is just our family dog (more like my 2nd child).

    2. #2
      Senior Dog
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      For the jumping and barking I would have him focus on you. Teach him the "watch me" command get his attention and keep it on you while people, bikes and other dogs pass. I started with Gauge at a distance and worked up at being able to walk next to someone without him getting all excited. I also would bring treats with me on walk to get his focus on me and treat him as things, people, dogs passed keeping his attention on me. The more I worked on it I could then start weening the treats away and he would just sit and watch and I could then control him with a leave it. We now walk in the park and he could care less sometimes with other dogs he wants to greet and I will allow a brief greeting if he is calm and of course if the owner of the other dog is ok with it. For the pulling I used the prong and I've used a gental leader which I use when going to new places or if thier are alot of distractions otherwise I uses a buckle collar. Basically when he would pull I would turn and walk the other direction and treat him when he would walk next to me. When we go to the park he doesn't have to be in heal position but i expect him not to pull me. So when there is tention on the leash we go the other direction so he learns that he never gets to where he wants to if he pulls. I also give praise verble and treats in the begining when hes doing what I want.

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    4. #3
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      I strongly recommend an organized group obedience class. With the right group, dogs are socialized with other dogs, people and distractions in a controlled environment. There may be certain physical cues from you that you are unaware of causing your pup to react. Good trainers have many tools to assist owners, voice inflection, physical action, treats, equipment, etc.

      Our current group of dogs are all rescues, each with their own set of behavioral issues (the reason they are with us) and the training and socialization was invaluable. Plus it can be a tremendous confidence builder for owner and dog.

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    6. #4
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      ZRabbits's Avatar
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      Have been using what Sheltielover has suggested, and have found "watch me"' starting to work. Lilly has been focusing on me more on walks. But definitely would look into an organized group obedience class. I'm looking into finding one now. Think it will do us both good learning different techniques, plus the socialization would be beneficial for Lilly.

      I'm using a "choke" collar, as I've done in the past. Maybe the "e-collar" could work along with your harness?

      KAZ

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    8. #5
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      Thanks to all for the good advice. We did do puppy training together and he earned good citizen however he gets excited and all rules are forgotten. He does well with treats in hand. I had to have spinal surgery so the follow through was not as great as we had planned. I think ill begin again once cleared to hold him again (still at a 10 lb limit) and use the suggestions then. -photo-1-jpg

    9. #6
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      For the jumping up, our trainer told us to step on the leash so they physically can't jump, and to have whoever is getting jumped on turn their back to the dog.
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    11. #7
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      I think he's got "selective" hearing. He knows what to do, but chooses not to. Lots of dogs get surrendered at that age, because of this. Plus because of your surgery (hoping you get your strength back soon), he's taking advantage of you. I see Lilly do this to my husband (back surgery too) when he's having a bad day. She jumps at him, something she wouldn't do when he's feeling good. When Lilly is like that, she gets leashed right away to keep her under control and to not let her hurt my husband, as she thinks it's play. Labs do play hard. Once leashed, she starts to jump so I'm definitely going to try doubledip1's suggestion.

      Also, always have treats in my pocket. When walking, I took the advise of a member to be diligent and look ahead. If I see people or dogs, I start to tell Lilly to "watch me". Also make myself not tense up, because I've notice she reacts to that as well. She's getting it. She's now just starting to, when she sees something that would excite her, she will turn and look at me. But then go nuts, lol.

      Go back to basics. Even while sitting with Jax, work with him. Let him know that you have treats in your pocket. Lilly, just today, started to come and sit real pretty beside me, and then poke her nose at my pocket, like, "Ok I did something good, maybe a treat should be given?".

      Jax will come around, but I think he needs to know that you are there to make the decisions and be the leader, not him.

      KAZ

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    13. #8
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      I have a very similar issue with Thor. He's an angel when he's just with me on our walks - walks nicely next to me and responds to my 'off's when something non-living does distract him (like a particularly lovely smelling plant). Since his strongest command is 'sit', I've started using that as soon as he notices someone or some dog. I can usually tell when he notices them at a distance because his ears will perk up and he'll move a bit forward out of the heel position. I'll stop then, and he's trained to go to a sit when I stop walking. I'll reinforce the sit at that time and praise him for paying attention to me. He still gets jumpy when we get closer, but I'll just go back to the 'sit' and try to distract him. He doesn't jump on me or my husband when we walk in the door, he comes and sits nicely, and that's how we trained him to do that so hopefully it will register soon!
      Mighty Thor, "So Much Dog", born 1/6/2014
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    15. #9
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      The prong collar and ecollar should never hurt. I was against the prong collar (I thought it was barbaric). But when our trainer suggested it for Mocha (he was pulling so hard, I had leash marks on my hands), I put it around my arm and pulled. It got my attention, but it wasn't painful. We had a session with our trainer on how to properly use it and it's like power steering! It keeps Mocha's attention when he gets distracted. When he sees me get it off the peg, he's so excited because he knows it's walk time.

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    17. #10
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      MightyThor, thanks so much. Worked with "sit" with Lilly when out on yesterday's evening walk. Got her attention right away. Was so thrilled, I couldn't wait to see if any distractions came up during the walk. Unfortunately ugly day, so hoping to try it today with distractions.

      Crafther: Agree that some dogs just need that type of collar, to get their attention. I use a choke collar as I have done in the past, with warning if not done properly, like the prong collar I would think, could hurt the dog. Having someone professional teach you is the way to go. Lilly was horrible with a regular collar. Couldn't control her at all. When I went to the choke collar, she really started to listen. Hoping to get lessons in the future and hopefully change from choke collar to harness. Am really looking at the e-collar as well.

      KAZ

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