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    Results 11 to 20 of 27
    1. #11
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      smartrock's Avatar
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      Hi and welcome! I don't have any new suggestions other than to add my vote for getting a well-bred lab from a reputable breeder since you have or anticipate having young children around the dogs. Both our labs came from small breeders who intended to keep a puppy or two themselves but all the puppies in the litters are obviously bred the same, not just for looks but for wonderful temperament, able to do what labs can do- hunt, service animals, companion animals, etc. The puppies going to pet homes are no less wonderful than the puppies being kept by the breeders or those going to be service animals. I feel like you have a better chance of getting the type of dog you want if you work with a breeder who is really invested in breeding puppies who are the best representatives of the breed.

      I have 2 young grandkids and our dogs have been so tolerant and so gentle with them. If you haven't had a lab puppy since your 12 year old lab died 5 years ago- 17 years total?- I will say that even labs bred for temperament can be wild little devils as puppies and you may no longer remember that phase. You may want to refresh your memory some by reading through the section on Puppy training before a puppy appears on your doorstep. I'd had boxers and bullmastiffs before getting our labs and boy, that first lab puppy wore us out even though he mellowed out and was the calmest, most gentle boy you'd ever want to know.

      We look forward to hearing how things work out for you and you family, so keep in touch!

    2. #12
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      Reelist's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Shelley View Post
      Are you going to the Rose City Labrador Retriever Club show at Champoeg state park July 12th, 13th and 14th? I would normally be attending this show, but I have 3 week old puppies right now. This will be an excellent opportunity to meet breeders and look at their Labradors they are exhibiting.

      If you go, please feel free to talk to breeders about potential litters they have planned, but be watchful of whether they are about to enter the show ring or not, as that can be a stressful time. If you see someone grooming their dog, playing with young dogs, or sitting at their set up, strike up a conversation with them, and tell them you are looking for a well bred, nice companion dog to add to your family. I know most breeders there would be happy to steer you to a nice litter, or answer any questions you may have. I wish I were going so I could meet you there.

      The CHIC (Canine Health Information Center) health clearance recommendations are a good place to start, but I would make an echocardiogram, as well as the Prcd-PRA exam to the list mandatory. Canine Health Information Center: CHIC Information
      If you have any questions about the tests, please ask and we can explain them.
      Hi!

      Yes, I’m going. I’m lucky that Champoeg is under 1/2 hr away. Thanks for encouraging me to attend.

      If you’ve been perhaps you can guide me to what events/times to go. There’s 3 days! Any preferences?

      Regarding the CHIC recommendations and breeders. I haven’t seen breeders that routinely perform the echocardiogram or Prcd-PRA tests. Are these relatively uncommon? I assume finding out what the parent’s health results are is a good guide to the litter’s health. Correct?

      This is great! Thanks everyone

    3. #13
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      Quote Originally Posted by smartrock View Post
      Hi and welcome! I don't have any new suggestions other than to add my vote for getting a well-bred lab from a reputable breeder since you have or anticipate having young children around the dogs. Both our labs came from small breeders who intended to keep a puppy or two themselves but all the puppies in the litters are obviously bred the same, not just for looks but for wonderful temperament, able to do what labs can do- hunt, service animals, companion animals, etc. The puppies going to pet homes are no less wonderful than the puppies being kept by the breeders or those going to be service animals. I feel like you have a better chance of getting the type of dog you want if you work with a breeder who is really invested in breeding puppies who are the best representatives of the breed.

      I have 2 young grandkids and our dogs have been so tolerant and so gentle with them. If you haven't had a lab puppy since your 12 year old lab died 5 years ago- 17 years total?- I will say that even labs bred for temperament can be wild little devils as puppies and you may no longer remember that phase. You may want to refresh your memory some by reading through the section on Puppy training before a puppy appears on your doorstep. I'd had boxers and bullmastiffs before getting our labs and boy, that first lab puppy wore us out even though he mellowed out and was the calmest, most gentle boy you'd ever want to know.

      We look forward to hearing how things work out for you and you family, so keep in touch!
      Thanks for the memories smartrock!

      Yes we do, quite well, remember those rambunctious early years. They were really something!

      Tiggers a question I’ve had. We are thinking ‘English’ type lab. Rio was a more ‘American’ style. True/false that (generally) English labs are mellow...

      Loving it all thanks so much. Reelist


      Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

    4. #14
      Senior Dog
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      We were told that too but also that you can get a pretty high energy Bench/Show Lab and you can get a mellow Field Lab. A good breeder will see differences in pups and guide you to the best pick of that litter. That said, several friends who hunt advised us to stay away from Field breeding. At the time, with young families and many demands on their time and maybe only getting out a few times a year to hunt, they found their field bred dogs a bit much to handle.

    5. #15
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      Quote Originally Posted by MightyThor View Post
      Not to derail the thread too much, but what is the etiquette around bringing dogs (non competing?) to these kind of events? I've never attended one, but Barley is a natural and smart as a whip at obedience and I hope to keep going with classes and maybe do events in the future. If I can get over there I'd love to watch and see how the whole thing is run, but it would also be nice to get him in that environment at a young age if I might compete with him in the future. But I certainly don't want to distract or be a nuisance!
      The AKC rules are pretty clear regarding dogs that are not entered in competition, they are not allowed on showgrounds. Specialties are a little bit more relaxed, and you could probably swing it, but things like prong collars are not allowed on show grounds, (presumably if you are showing or competing with your dog, they are trained past a training device type collar), or if an AKC representative is on the grounds, you may be asked to leave. Your breeders may be there, so maybe you could shoot them an email, and ask them if you can hang out and watch with them, and possibly bring Barley. I am sure they'd like to see him, and they can help it look like he possibly entered there for a puppy class. There is a 4-6 month (not for Championship points) competition, so puppies Barley's age will be there.


      Quote Originally Posted by Reelist View Post
      Hi!

      Yes, I’m going. I’m lucky that Champoeg is under 1/2 hr away. Thanks for encouraging me to attend.

      If you’ve been perhaps you can guide me to what events/times to go. There’s 3 days! Any preferences?

      Regarding the CHIC recommendations and breeders. I haven’t seen breeders that routinely perform the echocardiogram or Prcd-PRA tests. Are these relatively uncommon? I assume finding out what the parent’s health results are is a good guide to the litter’s health. Correct?

      This is great! Thanks everyone
      The show judging usually starts at 8am or 9am, and will be mostly the same entries each day, the classes are the same (Sweepstakes, regular classes, veteran's, stud dog and brood bitch, etc.. each day, just the judges will differ. I also suggest purchasing a show catalog, and ask one of the club members to help you read it and follow along. I recommend staying for all of the judging from start to finish at least one day.

      If you have encountered Labrador breeders that are not doing echocardiograms and don't know the status of their dogs' Prcd-PRA status, you have been looking in the wrong places ;-)
      There may still be the rare few that don't echo all of their dogs, (they should be!) but there is NO excuse for not testing/knowing their PRA status, since the testing is not expensive and one can easily prevent producing Labradors that go can blind. Same with EIC. Passing OFA Hips and Elbows scores are a must too.

      Quote Originally Posted by Reelist View Post
      Thanks for the memories smartrock!

      Yes we do, quite well, remember those rambunctious early years. They were really something!

      Tiggers a question I’ve had. We are thinking ‘English’ type lab. Rio was a more ‘American’ style. True/false that (generally) English labs are mellow...

      Loving it all thanks so much. Reelist


      Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
      Most breeders refer to the different types as "Bench" or "Show" bred, or "Field" bred, the English/American things can set some people off. The dogs in the conformation competition will be the Bench or Show bred variety. Whether they are more mellow or not, depends on what type of temperament your breeder selects for. All puppies can be rambunctious no matter their style. This is why it is a good idea to attend shows, where you can see the dogs temperaments for yourself.

    6. The Following User Says Thank You to Shelley For This Useful Post:

      MightyThor (07-02-2018)

    7. #16
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      It's pretty mellow there, so as long as your pup isn't barking, lunging a the dogs in the ring to play or being distracting, it'll be fine. However, the obedience and rally entries are extremely low and usually in just one ring, both obedience and rally are over by lunch. So, you might be disappointed there. Of course, the show dog area will be busy, so you'll still be in that atmosphere.

    8. #17
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      Quote Originally Posted by Reelist View Post
      Thanks for the memories smartrock!

      Yes we do, quite well, remember those rambunctious early years. They were really something!

      Tiggers a question I’ve had. We are thinking ‘English’ type lab. Rio was a more ‘American’ style. True/false that (generally) English labs are mellow...

      Loving it all thanks so much. Reelist


      Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
      You can get "English" type with drive. My new puppy's mom, who is bred to standard, is a Master Hunter (MH) 22 and the daddy is a Grand Champion (GCH - conformation) Master Hunter (MH). The pairing should result in some dual champion (conformation and hunt test) dogs. Probably not field trial champion dogs. My own conformation bred dog is energetic and busy. But my other conformation bred dog is very much pet material. He needs exercise, but he's not a "working dog". You just have to talk to the breeders.

    9. #18
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      Last question (here anyway ;-)

      I’ve read that some recommend a girl for a (primary) male owner, a boy for a female owner. And thoughts on that?

      Also heard that girls can be overprotective and that with little ones (grandkids) around a protective lab isn’t good.

      Thanks, reelist

    10. #19
      Senior Dog
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      Quote Originally Posted by Reelist View Post
      Last question (here anyway ;-)

      I’ve read that some recommend a girl for a (primary) male owner, a boy for a female owner. And thoughts on that?

      Also heard that girls can be overprotective and that with little ones (grandkids) around a protective lab isn’t good.

      Thanks, reelist
      Either gender is equally fine with either gender of owner, funny I have heard some crazy things, but haven't ever heard that one.

      "Protective", or "Overprotective" is not a word associated with a well bred Labrador Retriever. We always joke that if someone wants a watchdog, a Labrador is not the right breed, they will lead a robber to the sliver and jewelry cabinet, and give them kisses while they rob you blind. The Lab may bond to the kids, but they are not a protective breed, they do need to be socialized to children and babies, and those kids need to be supervised and taught not to torture the puppy/dog.

      Another thing we say on gender, is that that boys are "I Love You, I Love You, I Love You", and they girls are more, "Love Me, Love Me, Love Me", although my girls are very affectionate, so that rule does not always hold true either.

      The best thing you can do is purchase a puppy from a good breeder that breeds for good temperaments, and does something with their dogs, as well as does the full health clearances. High volume breeders, or breeders that don't spend a lot of time with their puppies (or adult dogs) should be avoided if you want a dog that will be good with kids.

    11. #20
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      Welcome to the forum! My husband and I are also bringing another lab puppy into our family in mid-July after many years of being without one; we're so excited! We found a very reputable breeder in our area in Georgia whose dogs compete (currently one National Masters Qualifier, one Master Hunter. and one Senior Hunter), but who also breeds for temperament/obedience, depending on the breeding pair. She only breeds one litter at a time; there aren't puppies out the ying-yang on her farm. Some of her puppies are best for pets and service dogs (the litter we're choosing from), while some are targeted for competing. Make sure the breeder you're interested in does breed-specific genetic testing, no matter if they're pet quality or competition/breeding quality. Puppies should be well-socialized and not just kept out in a barn/pen somewhere. Our puppy is being raised inside the breeders home, with their children and other pets/livestock around (proper health precautions taken, of course). Also make sure that the females are not used as constant breeding machines. Good luck!

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